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Doesn't an impeachment constitute a 'charge'?

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Jun 14th, 2008 at 11:06:32 AM EST
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First you get threatened with impeachment, then if it looks like it's going to happen you resign from office, then your successor pardons you. The advantage of resigning is that your successor is your own appointee.
by asdf on Sat Jun 14th, 2008 at 11:12:05 AM EST
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Once it has been voted by the House, for sure.  But the trial must occur in the Senate.  Should the Senate fail to impeach, I don't know if a subsequent criminal charge once the President has left office, would be considered double jeopardy.  Nor do I know if such post term prosecution is provided for in the U.S. Code.  Help.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 02:45:58 PM EST
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