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Impeachment does have problems, and isn't the only option:

  • Impeachment would focus attention on one or two individuals (distracting attention from the others);
  • It would focus on the legalistic details of few specific, prosecutable crimes;
  • It would distract attention from the reality of broad systemic abuse;
  • It would distract from what could be a massively realigning electoral process;
  • It would distract Congressional and public attention from positive action.

What do you think of the South African option, a Truth and Reconciliation Commission? It could be implemented post-election (unlike impeachment), would avoid the problems I've listed, and could to more to discredit the radical right than any one or hundred prosecutions.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 02:39:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is this Truth and Reconciliation Commission a hobby horse of yours, or have other people been suggesting that the US should have one? In any case, you could write a diary about it.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 04:22:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
A hobby of some sort, I suppose. When I see an idea with merit that isn't being discussed, sometimes I like to give it a push, mostly using the LWLC method (that's Lazy Wikipedia Link Comment). Writing a whole diary would make my perception of my own procrastination too overwhelming, I fear.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Tue Jun 17th, 2008 at 03:35:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Truth and reconciliation is probably good for whatever low-level apparatchiks who possess sufficiently useful skills to be retained in the absence of political patronage. But I am not sure that it would be a good idea for the highest echelons.

There has been an unfortunate history of American administrations committing crimes against humanity and walking away with barely a slap on the wrist. The truth and reconciliation committees worked in part because there was a very real threat that those involved would have been tried and convicted and lived out the rest of their lives in prison. I don't believe that anyone in the Bush regime believes that this is a realistic option when it comes to their crimes, so prosecuting a few of the end-of-level bad guys would show the rest of the gang that you mean business.

Actually prosecuting some of the bushies and putting them behind bars for a very long time would also demonstrate to the rest of the world that there are limits to the atrocities that US administrations can wreak with impunity. I should not think that I need to stress the effect this would have on the image and soft power of the US.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 05:53:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Focused criminal prosecution, to be completed post-election, has few problems that I can see. As you point out, there would be great value.

Words and ideas I offer here may be used freely and without attribution.
by technopolitical on Tue Jun 17th, 2008 at 03:31:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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