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-- But if a fighting force constitutes an army in every respect but the wearing of uniforms (but what is a uniform? -- red coats? -- camouflage suits? -- gang colors? -- arm bands?), does this make them not an army? -- Wouldn't prosecuting them as civilians overwhelm a system intended for a different purpose? -- Aren't there some precedents to consider (whatever they may be)? -- As a long-term question, shouldn't all this be reassessed with due consideration of the inevitable future context, that of fine-grained, universal surveillance?

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by technopolitical on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 03:09:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There are precedents for that: The various resistance movements in the Axis-occupied territories during WWII. I believe that they are treated as regular combatants. But note that IANAL.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 06:11:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The resistance movements were considered ad hoc defencive formations by the Allies, of course. The Axis called them "terrorists."

Not to put too fine a point upon it, but there seems to be something of a similarity here...

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sun Jun 15th, 2008 at 06:14:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
-- But if a fighting force constitutes an army in every respect but the wearing of uniforms (but what is a uniform? -- red coats? -- camouflage suits? -- gang colors? -- arm bands?), does this make them not an army? -- Wouldn't prosecuting them as civilians overwhelm a system intended for a different purpose? -- Aren't there some precedents to consider (whatever they may be)? -- As a long-term question, shouldn't all this be reassessed with due consideration of the inevitable future context, that of fine-grained, universal surveillance?

Perhaps, perhaps, perhaps, no.

The point is that there are only two categories of people, civilians and combatants. And there are legal systems to handle each case. Bush's trying to invent a new category and then a new legal system to handle it is the problem.

by asdf on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 08:23:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
asdf:
Bush's trying to invent a new category and then a new legal system to handle it is the problem.

I don't think Bush is trying to invent a new category. I think Bush is saying 'I can do wtf I like and you can't stop me heh heh heh.' He's then leaning on the government machine to cover his ass with rationalisations - which he doesn't personally care about, and probably doesn't even understand.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 02:20:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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