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I propose one major change, which I consider important. Instead of just having country boxes connected to EU institutions, there should be country boxes with "ears" representing governments. Then, two sets of different-coloured, but light shaded arrows should point to the Parliament resp. the Council. So that people understand that the Council represents the governments, the EP the people.

Speaking of the Council, the "Council of States" (which may  be better called "Council of Ministers") should be below the "Council of Heads", and the two should be twinned.

It may also be better if the Commission (to which we could 'twin' a "Directorates" bubble, the same way the "Council of States") is placed sideways of the Council, because while it is de-facto less important than the Council, it is (1) the de-facto government of the EU, (2) it is further removed from the countries.

As for the various lesser funds and bodies (of which the EZB is a major omission), maybe that could be worth a separate graph, rather than cluttering up this one.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 04:10:33 AM EST
I think we're putting the cart before the horses. First we have to define what information we want to represent and then work on the best visual representation.

For instance, let's just say that we want a "who nominates/appoints/elects whom" graph.  Then the first thing you do is research and list all the *A {does B to} C" that we want to chart. And then we arrange the A's and C's so that the B arrows connecting them are a  uncluttered as possible. And then we can add additional labels for voting weights, qualified majority vs. unanimity, etc. And there is a time dimension as well in that certain thing happen in sequence.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 04:44:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Colour coding can also be used to connect physically separate parts of the diagram. Or connecting lines only appear when a country is <rolled over>.

There are many ways to do it. The most important factor imo is presenting  informatively and interestingly, for an audience with a short attention span. It also has to be correct, as we see it (not necessarily what the EU wants to say about itself officially.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 09:30:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I am focusing on processes and the natural representation of processes as arrow diagrams.

When the capital development of a country becomes a by-product of the activities of a casino, the job is likely to be ill-done. — John M. Keynes
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 09:36:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
That's fine. Whatever is more practical for those involved in the research.

A text-based analysis will be a lot easier to discuss here at ET.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Mon Jun 16th, 2008 at 09:42:56 AM EST
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