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THIS, THAT, AND THE OTHER

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 02:50:57 PM EST
The Battle for the North Pole: Melting Ice Brings Competition for Resources - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International

By Gerald Traufetter

Climate change is freeing the Arctic of ice -- and spurring a global competition for the natural resources stored beneath. Countries that border the sea are staking new territorial claims and oil giants are dispatching geologists. But what will the tug-of-war mean for the indigenous people and wildlife?

Part 2: An Arctic Cold War?

National covetousness and unclear rights of ownership could even lead to a cold war in the Arctic Ocean. Although the foreign ministers of the five Arctic nations came to a diplomatically worded agreement this spring to further strengthen "cooperation in the Arctic Ocean," this certainly does not stop these countries from embarking on a massive military buildup in the region.

Part 3: Russia Flexes its Muscles

The Russian Defense Ministry provoked Norway when it sent the warship "Severomorsk" to cruise the waters off Spitsbergen this summer. Two days later, the Russian air force conducted firing exercises over the Barents Sea with Tu-22M3 supersonic bombers.

It was all part of a series of previously arranged exercises. But Russian military leaders later said, with the poker faces and rhetoric of the powerful, that they had "reestablished a military presence in the Arctic." The fronts in the new Cold War are still drawn between the old blocs, and the theaters are the same, but exactly where these fronts are located remains unclear.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 02:55:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Art and War: Berlin's Jewish Museum Displays Looted Paintings - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International
Six decades after World War II, debate still rages over whether to force German museums to return valuable art pieces to their pre-war Jewish owners. A new exhibition in Berlin traces the fate of works looted by Nazis.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 03:06:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dispute among Islam Scholars: Did Muhammad Ever Really Live? - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International
A number of Islamic associations have put a quick end to their collaboration with a professor -- and trainer of people who are supposed to teach Islam in German high schools -- who has expressed his doubt that Muhammad ever lived. Islam scholar Michael Marx spoke with SPIEGEL ONLINE about what lies behind the debate and the historical person of the Prophet.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 03:09:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Wealth of new species found at the Great Barrier Reef - Science, News - The Independent

Among the discoveries were dozens of small crustaceans, a rare insect-like animal with a whip-like back leg three times the length of its body and a jellyfish that floats upside down to dangle its tentacles in the sunlight.

About half of the 300 soft corals found are thought to be new discoveries, although they will only be given names and classified formally once the scientists have compared them against existing species. Unlike their hard-bodied cousins, soft corals do not build reefs but are nevertheless considered vital for the marine environment. These colourful animals can dominate some regions of the sea, covering up to 25 per cent of the ocean floor.

The four-year project is centred on the extensive coral reefs of western and north-western Australia and is part of a larger effort to take a census of all marine life in the world, due to be finished in 2010. When complete, the census will be used as a "baseline" to try to quantify the rate at which species are becoming extinct in the marine environment.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 04:38:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Is it possible to have an 'out-of-body'experience? - Science, News - The Independent

The Awareness during Resuscitation experiment (Aware) is an expansion of a pilot scheme run by the Human Consciousness Project at the University of Southampton, which specialises in studying the human brain, consciousness and death.

About 25 centres in the US and Britain, including Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, University Hospital in Birmingham and the Morriston Hospital in Swansea, will take part in the experiment. Over the next three years about 15,000 patients will be brought to these hospitals suffering from cardiac arrest. Around 1,500 are likely to be resuscitated and hundreds will probably claim they had some sort of out-of-body experience when they were clinically dead.

To test whether such experiences involve the mind leaving the body, pictures will be placed around the areas of the hospital where heart attacks occur most frequently, such as accident and emergency and intensive care units. The pictures will only be visible from above. If patients are able to describe these pictures, project leaders argue that scientists will have to rethink how they understand the mind.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 04:41:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Rätselhafte Botschaften auf Plakatwänden (Zürich , NZZ Online) Puzzling messages on billboards (Zurich, NZZ Online)
Seit Jahren versieht ein Unbekannter in der Stadt Zürich Werbeplakate und Baustellenabschrankungen mit mysteriösen biblischen Sprüchen. Zum Schreiben verwendet er stets einen blauen Filzstift. Zwei Mitarbeiter der Universität Zürich haben das Phänomen untersucht.For years, an unknown person is tagging billboards and construction site covers in the city of Zurich with mysterious biblical sayings. For writing, he always uses a blue felt-tip pen. Two employees of Zurich University have studied the phenomenon.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 04:57:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If researchers want to read weird shit written all over town send them to the US, start with San Francisco.
by paving on Sat Sep 20th, 2008 at 04:21:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Welshmen who went up a hill, but came down a mountain | UK news | guardian.co.uk

Snowdonia's Mynydd Graig Goch, left, was a hill yesterday. Now it is a mountain. Photograph: Dr Jeremy Williams/Envirodata-Eryri

Hours of taking measurements in wind and rain have paid off for the proud people of Wales who woke up today to discover that they have a new mountain.

More than 7,000 satellite readings have persuaded the Ordnance Survey that Mynydd Graig Goch in Snowdonia has been wrongly recorded as a mere hill for more than a century.

The difference is just 30 inches in rock and earth, but an enormous leap in terms of linguistics and status. Now reclassified as standing six inches over 2,000ft (609 metres), instead of the previous official height of 1,998ft, the craggy outcrop between Porthmadog and the Lleyn peninsular has become Wales' 190th official mountain.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 05:18:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This could be a movie!

Life imitates art.

by Magnifico on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 06:17:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]

"We're very pleased to have proved that Mynydd Graig Goch is a mountain and not a hill. The Ordnance Survey has agreed to update its maps on the internet straight away."

Paper maps will be corrected on the next print run, in a real-life rerun of the 1995 film The Englishman Who Went Up A Hill But Came Down A Mountain. Set in 1917 and starring Hugh Grant as a government cartographer, the comedy describes how Welsh villagers ingeniously challenge a proposed downgrading of their local landmark from a mountain to a hill.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Sep 20th, 2008 at 02:13:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
i loved that flick...
sweet catch dodo!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Sep 20th, 2008 at 01:15:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC NEWS | Science/Nature | Hadron Collider forced to halt

Plans to begin smashing particles at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) may be delayed after a magnet failure forced engineers to halt work.

The failure, known as a quench, caused around 100 of the LHC's super-cooled magnets to heat up by as much as 100C.

The fire brigade were called out after a tonne of liquid helium leaked into the tunnel at Cern, near Geneva.

Cant you just see the firemen reporting this with high pitched squeeky voices from all the helium.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 06:11:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I could imagine them seeing their foot fracture into dozens of pieces on its second step into liquid helium.  No joke.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 06:26:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Scary. Really.

And expensive.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 07:36:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
it's not like theres a lot going spare either

Helium supplies endangered, threatening science and technology

The element that lifts things like balloons, spirits and voice ranges is being depleted so rapidly in the world's largest reserve, outside of Amarillo, Texas, that supplies are expected to be depleted there within the next eight years.


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 07:55:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Today marks the Beginning of the End (praise Jeebus) as early voting has started in Virginia.

Only 45 days until this damn thing is over.

Only 47 days until the kick-off of the 2012 US Presidential election.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri Sep 19th, 2008 at 10:45:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Boing Boing
As I read the dense, long reviews and letters explaining the merits of this or that tool, it all seemed comfortably familiar. Then I realized why. These missives in the Catalog were blog postings. Except rather than being published individually on home pages, they were handwritten and mailed into the merry band of Whole Earth editors who would typeset them with almost no editing (just the binary editing of print or not-print) and quickly "post" them on cheap newsprint to the millions of readers who tuned in to the Catalog's publishing stream. No topic was too esoteric, no degree of enthusiasm too ardent, no amateur expertise too uncertified to be included. The opportunity of the catalog's 400 pages of how-to-do it information attracted not only millions of readers but thousands of Makers of the world, the proto-alpha geeks, the true fans, the nerds, the DIYers, the avid know-it-alls, and the tens of thousands wannabe bloggers who had no where else to inform the world of their passions and knowledge. So they wrote Whole Earth in that intense conversational style, looking the reader right in the eye and holding nothing back: "Here's the straight dope, kid." New York was not publishing this stuff. The Catalog editors (like myself) would sort through this surplus of enthusiasm, try to index it, and make it useful without the benefit of hyperlinks or tags. Using analog personal publishing technology as close to the instant power of InDesign and html as one could get in the 1970s and 80s (IBM Selectric, Polaroids, Lettraset) we slapped the postings down on the wide screens of newsprint, and hit the publish button.

it's a wonderful memory, what a breakthrough this was for the 70's.

the budding of a new paradigm, the happiest fusion of theory, often madcap, and practice, very funky, nutty, sometimes granola, always curious, very low tech when possible, playful...

co-evolution quarterly continued in the same vein, great articles about fascinating subjects, manna from heaven!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Sep 20th, 2008 at 12:34:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Daily Kos: Allow Me to Put On a Tinfoil Hat...

In the late 18th century wars and trade with China, which sold many trade goods to Europe but the Chinese had little use for European goods (and demanded silver bullion for all payment).  (The trade imbalance literally) drained silver from the economies of Western Europe and the United States. Coins were struck in smaller and smaller amounts, and there was a proliferation of bank and Demand Notes used as money.

In the 1790s (due to Chinese hoarding), Britain suffered a massive shortage of silver coinage and ceased to mint larger silver coins. It issued "token" silver coins and overstruck foreign coins. With the end of the Napoleonic Wars, Britain began a massive recoinage program that created standard gold sovereigns and circulating crowns, half-crowns, and eventually copper farthings in 1821. In 1833, Bank of England notes were made legal tender, and redemption by other banks was discouraged.

 Wikipedia

plus ca change...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Sep 20th, 2008 at 11:29:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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