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Theoretically speaking, you can file for aktindsigt (approx. "freedom of information request") with any publicly Swedish institution for any kind of documents that do not contain sensitive personal information (unless it's about yourself) or (reasonably narrowly defined) state secrets. That includes universities. And that includes source code and raw experimental data.

In practise, if there's a paper in the pipeline your request will be "unavoidably delayed" until the paper is published, or files will "go missing."

But after they've wrung the last publication out of a project, you should in principle be able to get to their code and data.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Sun Nov 22nd, 2009 at 10:52:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There are a few more cases, though they rarely apply here:

A swedish kind of death:

In the 18th century there were two parties - the Hats and the Caps - fighting for control over government. They did not trust each other with power so to make sure neither side abuse governmental power all governmentally produced documents were made public, except those classified by proper authority for the proper reason and that list of reasons is pretty short, here it is:

Offentlighetsprincipen The principle of publicity
Vilka handlingar får hållas hemliga? Which documents can be kept secret
Allmänna handlingar får i vissa fall hållas hemliga, nämligen då de skyddar följande intressen:
  • rikets säkerhet eller dess förhållande till annan stat eller mellanfolklig organisation
  • rikets centrala finanspolitik, penningpolitik eller valutapolitik
  • myndigheters verksamhet för inspektion, kontroll eller annan tillsyn
  • intresset att förebygga eller beivra brott
  • det allmännas ekonomiska intresse
  • skyddet för enskilds personliga eller ekonomiska förhållanden
  • intresset att bevara djur- eller växtart
Public records can in some cases be kept secret, if they protect the following interests:
  • the security of the realm or its relation to other state or intragovernmental organisation
  • the centrala finance-, monetary- or currency-politics of the realm
  • governmental agencies inspection, control or other similar activities (to enforce laws and regulations)
  • the interest of preventing or investigating crimes
  • the economic interest of the public
  • the protection of the individuals personal or economic situation
  • the interest of keeping animal or plant species

Naturally exactly what is covered by which bulletpoint has been extensively tried in courts (as is often the case with really old laws).

Email has not been tried afaik, but should be public as mail is (unless contents are covered by any of the bullet points). So the emails of swedish researchers (climate or otherwise) should be available by request.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Tue Nov 24th, 2009 at 09:19:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, as long as other research institutions in other countries aren't complying with similar regulations, there is arguably an economic interest to the public in not giving up the data for free. See discussion of free-rider issues downthread.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Nov 24th, 2009 at 09:28:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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