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Another, and in my opinion fairly major, advantage of a "must release upon publication" doctrine would be that it would prevent "paper chop shops" where something that intellectually and research-wise could and should and would have been a single, coherent paper is chopped into half a dozen bits and pieces and sent to as many different journals in order to maximise impact factor.

If you have to release your data after the "preliminary investigation report" there'd be an incentive to delay publishing until you have a paper that you think will actually be cited by anybody outside your own department and close friends.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Nov 23rd, 2009 at 02:58:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
... we're on the subject of side benefits, it would also provide substantial insurance against universities being co-opted by corporate interests.

If universities have to make all data completely public, corporate attempts to hide, fabricate or spin results would be in direct conflict with the prestige of the participating scientists. Which is a rather more compelling incentive to refrain from participating in a project than vague concerns about academic ethics.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Nov 23rd, 2009 at 03:38:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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