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Regulatory aspects of the integration of wind generation in European electricity markets

As Member States (MSs) come under increasing pressure to deliver low-carbon, secure forms of energy, focus continues to rest on the deployment of renewable energy. Given the natural resources available and the associated costs, many MSs are concentrating their efforts on increasing their deployment of wind generation.

European energy regulators are considering these issues to ensure that the regime facilitates the deployment of wind generation and does not inhibit market integration. The purpose of this report on Regulatory aspects of the integration of wind generation in European electricity markets is to present European energy regulators' thoughts on how wind generation should be integrated into the market and network arrangements and to highlight areas for further consideration in light of its increasing deployment.

This paper should be considered as a first step in discussions with stakeholders. The ideas presented in the paper should not be considered to represent CEER's definitive position on the subject. Rather, the report is intended to highlight the most important issues in integrating wind generation and to seek feedback from stakeholders as to how they should be addressed. In some areas, CEER points out principles that it considers to be relevant and on which it would welcome feedback. In many cases, detailed work on a particular topic relates to areas considered by European energy regulators. The conclusions from this consultation will serve to inform regulators' future work and understanding of the issues as they affect wind generation.

CEER invites all stakeholders interested in the regulatory implications of integrating wind generation into European electricity markets to respond to this consultation, both in general and in relation to the questions in Section 1.4 of the report.

Interested parties are invited to submit comments by 18 February 2010 and these should be sent by e-mail to:  wind@ceer.eu.



In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 31st, 2009 at 06:25:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Renewables are, sorry to say, a smokescreen for fossile fuel interests.
Take the German example : under german law solar and wind are heavily subsidised via feed in tarrifs, which is expected to result in a grid that is about 10% renewable one of these days - This means that said grid would still be 70% fossil and 20 percent nuclear, and the projected costs to the German state of the current policy of feed in tariffs for renewable electricity are sufficiently high that if this money were invested in building EPR's via cash financing instead, the result would be the creation of a german sister to EDF- A wholly stateowned and debtfree utility with sufficient reactors to power 100 % of German demand. - Which would rather bankrupt, eh, all, the existing utilities. (because competing with a reactor which has had its capital costs written off is impossible. )
by Thomas on Fri Jan 8th, 2010 at 05:20:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EDF- A wholly stateowned and debtfree utility with sufficient reactors to power 100 % of German demand. - Which would rather bankrupt, eh, all, the existing utilities.

Which is why the European Union in its attempt to create a "market", is trying to break EDF's monopoly, over which our Jérôme regularly throws a fit.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Jan 8th, 2010 at 05:56:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Subsidising via feed-in tariffs?

The French, Italian and German experience with take-or-pay contracts for gas (essentially a form of feed-in tariff, but with GazProm instead of the states) is that it gives cheaper and more secure supply than trading it on the spot market.

The Danish experience is that feed-in tariffs give cheaper electricity.

See also: Why wind needs feed-in tariffs (and why it is not the enemy of nuclear).

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Fri Jan 8th, 2010 at 01:27:03 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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