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I doubt that any opinion you voice would be heeded by the decision makers. After all, if your argument is that the status quo is wrong, you are obviously not a Serious Person and can be ignored.

Nevertheless, if you're making this argument at conferences where the advisors to the Elites gather you are doing good. Tho' as we have mentioned before, it's hard to believe an argument when your paycheck depends on you disregarding it.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 09:12:08 AM EST
Perhaps J's voice is not yet heeded, though one can argue it certainly is in the process already, but at least he is taken seriously and is listened to.  There are also many decision makers in both the public and private sectors who are making real noises about turning the Titanic around.  In your neck of the woods, was it the ex-chief of the BoE who called for real reform of banking, and Ed Miliband himself calling for a restructuring of energy markets?

I think it makes much sense to draft an input to this EU process, and I for one would help craft it.

(Can't believe i'm drawn to comment less than 24H after last night's OT.  Nice work, J.)

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 10:03:31 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When the ex-chief of the BoE calls for reform, don't assume it's the sort of reform we think is necessary. Anymore than Greenspan or Bernanke could be assumed to reform the US financial system in a useful manner.

their agenda is not ours.

Ed Milliband is one of the better people at the top of the Labour party. Sadly he defers to his elder and more conservative brother too readily.  

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 10:12:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
heh, insert cliche about darkest hour etc!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 11:52:07 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I usually conclude my presentations with two slides that make people react:

  • one is a sweet one that says European energy policy can be summed up in 2 sentences: "what is our gas doing under your tundra" and "a jobs programme for City bankers"
  • one is a quick summary of the contradictions of current policies (why say you're worried about Russian gas when your current policies are all about building more gas-burining plants / if energy is strategic, why the longstanding attempts to break up the national champions that have proved they work / if cheap energy is a goal, why the refusal to act on the cost of capital, which is the single biggest driver?

And I make it clear that this is a fight between the British (and Americans) on one side and the French and Germans on the other:

"France has the cheapest electricity, the lowest carbon emissions, the most diversified gas supplies, why is European energy policy about breaking EDF and GDF?"

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 12:24:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm unclear as to what America has to do with it...

And there is the ugly little side issue of France's colonial exploitation of Niger as a nuclear fuel source, and the question of nuclear waste disposal. Wind is fine, but France's low carbon emissions and cheap electricity come with a social cost that is not being factored in...

by asdf on Wed Dec 30th, 2009 at 03:32:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
this is about the neolib, corporatist, bankers-first ideology which has been largely promoted out of the City and Wall St - using "UK and US" is indeed an unpleasant shortcut, sorry.

As to Niger, I'm all in favor of "full accounting" for all energy sources, as this can only make renewable energy look better, overall. I'd note that given the much lower portion of fuel costs in nuclear, the social impact of the extraction of uranium has to be much lower than that of fossil fuels; I'd also note that the majority of the uranium used in France comes from Canada, Australia and the former Soviet Union...

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 31st, 2009 at 06:18:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More of the same: Office Map
by jayjay (jeremy [at] will-hier-weg.de) on Thu Dec 31st, 2009 at 08:15:01 AM EST
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you can only link to files which are on the internet - you seem to have linked to an address on your own computer. If you send it to me by email, I can post it.

In the long run, we're all dead. John Maynard Keynes
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Dec 31st, 2009 at 09:14:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
my bad (should no better)

From Divers
by jayjay (jeremy [at] will-hier-weg.de) on Thu Dec 31st, 2009 at 10:56:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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