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JakeS:
Retail banks should not be run for profit.

Retail banks are unnecessary - and in fact moribund - intermediaries. Retail banking - ie credit creation and clearing - is a necessary utility function.

JakeS:

Retail banks are utilities and should be run by the government, like all other utilities.

I do not believe Government should run utilities.  I think that an optimal enterprise model for utilities is a cooperative of service providers in partnership with a cooperative of service users, within parameters set by government.

I believe that such a "Not for Loss" utility model is both possible and necessary.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Sun Feb 22nd, 2009 at 04:50:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wasn't trying to give precise prescriptions for the fine details of the architecture.

In a well-run society, it is not clear that it is trivial to distinguish between "government" and "non-government" - witness the role of labour unions as a kind of quasi-government in 20th century Scandinavia. So what I meant to say was "should be run by an entity that's more state and/or collective than private and/or individual." Your model would certainly qualify as that. Although I'm not convinced that it's necessarily the optimal model for things like water and railroads (and to some degree electricity) which are by their very nature large, integrated systems that must be micromanaged to a considerable extent by a central hub.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 02:40:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
JakeS:
Your model would certainly qualify as that. Although I'm not convinced that it's necessarily the optimal model for things like water and railroads (and to some degree electricity) which are by their very nature large, integrated systems that must be micromanaged to a considerable extent by a central hub.

Ummm...good point, but a strong management core need not necessarily mean hierarchy,just a much more significant node on the network.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 03:19:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
More and less significant nodes are a hierarchy.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 03:26:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't think so, any more than more or less significant people connected directly are a hierarchy.

It's about direct routing of information, disintermediation, and flat, rather than multi-level structures.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 05:20:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Railways are fundamentally a different kind of network that the internet. The internet is scale-free, railroads are not. So an organisational structure that's adapted to internet reality has a high probability of not being viable when applied to railroads, and vice versa.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 04:40:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
hmmm running the railways as the internet. Packet switching individual carriages? Passengers allowed to debark when the train is re-assembled at the far end?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 05:07:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
My point is that direct - instantaneous "network presence" - connection is leading to an entirely different architecture of generic application.

The enterprise model - legal XML, if you like - is only just beginning to adapt to this.

For physical networks, different rules apply.

"The future is already here -- it's just not very evenly distributed" William Gibson

by ChrisCook (cojockathotmaildotcom) on Mon Feb 23rd, 2009 at 05:16:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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