Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
EUROPE
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 03:23:49 PM EST
Internet traffic in Sweden plummets on first day of law banning web piracy | Technology | guardian.co.uk

Internet traffic in Sweden - previously a hotbed of illicit filesharing - has fallen dramatically in the first day of a new law banning online piracy.

The country - home to the notorious Pirate Bay website, whose founders are awaiting a court judgment on whether they have broken the law by allowing people to find films, games and music for illicit downloads - has previously been seen as a haven for filesharing, in which people can get copyrighted content for free.

As many as one in 10 Swedes is thought to use such peer-to-peer services.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 03:36:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The **AA's have stopped uploading and seeding fake/trap files into the P2P scene?
by paving on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 04:53:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dignitas prepares legal challenge over assisted suicide for healthy people | Society | guardian.co.uk

The founder of a Swiss clinic that has helped hundreds of people with terminal and mental illnesses die said today he was seeking a change to the law to allow his organisation to help healthy people kill themselves.

Ludwig Minelli, whose Dignitas group has helped more than 100 mostly terminally ill Britons to die, told the BBC he planned to test the legality of helping a healthy person end their life alongside their dying partner.

Minelli said Dignitas was preparing a legal challenge in Switzerland to see whether a doctor could write a lethal prescription for someone who is not ill.

"There is a couple living in Canada, the husband is ill, his partner is not ill but she told us here in my living room that, 'If my husband goes, I would go at the same time with him'," he said.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 03:36:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Dunno why they need to do all this stuff. A small tent and a CO2 fire extinguisher is just as good. Painless and dignified.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 3rd, 2009 at 12:43:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
What?? CO2? Are you crazy? Better go with helium or nitrogen or some other inert, readily available gas. Rising CO2 concentration in you blood will trigger the suffocation panic reaction.(Air hunger - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)
Perhaps, in the strict sense of the word, painless, but certainly neither pleasant, nor dignified!
by someone (s0me1smail(a)gmail(d)com) on Fri Apr 3rd, 2009 at 12:56:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, not air hunger, but a whole lungful. Triggers a clean anphalactic reaction that puts you to sleep in 30 seconds and spark out in 3 minutes.

I have been told that two lungfuls of CO2 will kill you even if you breath good air after. No distress or anything.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Fri Apr 3rd, 2009 at 06:19:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver

EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The European Parliament on Thursday (2 April) passed a bill banning discrimination against people on the basis of age, disability, sexual orientation, belief or religion in the areas of education, social security, health care and goods and services.

The draft law was passed on Thursday (2 April) by 363 votes in favour and 226 against after the left wing and liberal MEPs clubbed together to back the legislation. Many centre-right MEPs were against the proposal saying it would lead to too much red tape.

"Despite the obvious benefits of greater equality in all areas of society, it has taken months of hard work to win support for the new legislation in the European Parliament," said the author of the report, Dutch green MEP Kathalijne Buitenweg.

Dutch liberal MEP Sophie in ´t Veld said: "Today the European Parliament will emphasize that it does not matter if you are black or white, gay or heterosexual, religious, disabled, young or old. Europe will protect your freedom and will make sure that you will get all the possibilities you deserve to make something of your life."

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 03:52:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No mention of economic discrimination?

Probably still somewhat ambitious, but it would be good to get it on the agenda.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 07:49:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Thus allowing old geezers to get state funding for degrees that we will be too old to make use of. <-- Retirement Strategy.
by asdf on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 10:02:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why does a degree have to be "useful"? IMHO, that's just an Anglo-Diseased point of view.

--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$
by martingale on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 11:49:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think if one is going to accept Public money then there is an obligation to do or return something - considered broadly - for that money.

 

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 12:33:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Universities already do something useful with public money, eg cancer research etc.

--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$
by martingale on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 05:38:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Or education...

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 06:06:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Those pesky students.... I'd forgotten about them :)

You know, sometimes I hear them in the corridors....

--
$E(X_t|F_s) = X_s,\quad t > s$

by martingale on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 06:12:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
is the biggest problem with modern research universities.

See Morris Kline on the topic. He wrote over 30 years ago, but things haven't gotten any better.

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 06:15:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
EUobserver

EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - Talks between EU member states and MEPs on a directive that would limit the working week across the 27-nation bloc to 48 hours did not lead to an agreement on Thursday (2 April), reducing the chances of the legislation being adopted at all.

"An exhaustive round of negotiations between the EU member states and the European Parliament, which ended in the small hours of Thursday, did not result in an agreement on the five-year-old proposal," the Czech EU presidency said in a press release.

EU social affairs commissioner Vladimir Spidla said that the commission had done "its utmost to help both the European Parliament and the Council [the EU member states] reconcile the differences in their views."

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 03:54:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Very disappointing, especially in a recession where people are taking cuts to their hours to keep their jobs and the long hours culture is still acceptable with policy makers.
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 03:54:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Must keep flexible to escape recession. Don't you know anything?

It's like escapology.

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 04:22:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Keep women on part time, casual, insecure and low paid contracts and sack them when the going gets tough?

Flexi without the curity.

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 04:26:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Think of it as throwing off the chains that bind you.

 All hail freedom! Freedom from the cares of wealth! Freedom from working out what to do you your free time! Freedom from your family, who you never have to see working three jobs to feed them!

Workers of the world, cast off the chains of regulation, you have nothing to lose but your health!

by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 04:30:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why stop with Women?
by paving on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 04:55:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No reason not to include men who work low paid and insecure jobs but my point really is that the money going into saving the world from recession is not being distributed in a gender neutral way.  Women are proportionally much more likely to be in the low paid, insecure jobs than men are, and women are not paid fairly for doing the same work as a man, hence the gender pay gap.  Women are also more likely to hold multiple part time casual contracts than men are and increasingly families (single parent or otherwise) rely on the woman's income to keep them out of poverty.  
by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 05:42:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Does anyone have secure jobs any more?
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 07:50:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Why, of course!  Whores of the ruling elite!  There everywhere!

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 09:51:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Keep women on part time, casual, insecure and low paid contracts and sack them when the going gets tough?

What is really perverse about this is the founder of the Grameen Bank, Muhammad Yunus, discovered.  If you give women economic power, i.e., a micro-credit loan, they use it to raise the nutrition level of family meals, send the children to school, and do other things to increase the living standard of their family.  If they give the loans to men they piss it away.

Number of reasons for this and it certainly doesn't hold in any individual case.  Principal is sound, however.


She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 12:48:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... but what about interest?

Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 4th, 2009 at 04:08:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Greece: general strike disrupts entire country | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 02.04.2009
Greeks took to the streets to demonstrate against the dismal economy, high unemployment and low wages. 

 A nationwide 24-hour strike brought most of Greece to a halt on Thursday as tens of thousands of demonstrators marched peacefully through major cities to protest against Prime Minister Costas Karamanlis' conservative government.

The strike was called by the country's private sector federation GSEE and its public sector union ADEDY. Together, they represent about half of the country's workforce. Union banners read : "We did not cause the crisis; we're not going to pay for it".

by In Wales (inwales aaat eurotrib.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 04:02:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm waiting for this to come to CA.

They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 2nd, 2009 at 09:52:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series