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by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 01:55:19 PM EST
Cleaning Up the Men's Mess: Iceland's Women Reach for Power - SPIEGEL ONLINE - News - International

Iceland's women are blaming men for the financial crisis that has brought the country to its knees, They are now looking for a female solution to clean up the mess. Caretaker Prime Minister Johanna Sigurdardottir is heading into this weekend's election with good chances of winning.

It's not shadenfreude that can be read between the lines when Halla Tomasdottir talks about Iceland's financial crisis and her country's bankruptcy, but there may be a bit of satisfaction. "A lot had gone wrong, some things didn't make sense and it couldn't go on that way," the economist says. "We warned it would happen."

Halla was general director of the chamber of commerce when she issued those warnings, but nobody wanted to listen to her advice. She then parted ways and started her own company together with banker Kristin Petursdottir. Kristin had been a manager at the British subsidiary of the crisis-stricken Icelandic bank Kaupthing. Together, Halla and Kristin formed Audur Capital, a financial and investment company that would take a new path.

by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 01:58:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Gah, essentialism sucks. I would remind everybody of Thatcher and her illustrious forerunner, Lucretia Borgia as demonstration that women can be every bit as depraved and ego driven as a man. It is culture and (lack of) opportunity that creates the illusion that women are less competitive, but that is a denial of women's humanity for good or ill.

Men can be good and altruistic, women can be selfish and destructive, why is that so hard to accept?

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:50:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I agree, but it's mostly men who are actually in charge...
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 05:52:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
UK among the worst places in Europe for children - EUobserver

EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The happiest children are to be found in the Netherlands while Britain is among the worst countries in Europe in which to grow up, a new study examining children's wellbeing in 29 European countries has shown.

The report, by the Child Poverty Action Group, compares 43 separate criteria such as health, education and housing standards in EU member states as well as Norway and Iceland.

Children are best off in the Netherlands and Scandinavia

The Netherlands followed by Sweden and Norway are the countries considered to be the best places in which to be a child.

At the bottom of the league are Romania, Bulgaria, Latvia, Lithuania and Malta.

by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 01:59:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
There seems to be a survey like that every few years, with the U.K always coming out  worst. I studied one such survey in detail a few years ago, and I noticed that the ranking of Italy would depend on how you weight the various factors: they were at the bottom for education, immediately below Scandinavia for heath, and at the top for relations with family and friends. The U.K., on the other hand, were at the bottom in nearly every category.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:31:31 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I always say that Britian falls between the stalls of the good bits of the US or Europe, we are the worst of both worlds. Still, it gives us a certain sense of humour.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:52:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Which we need.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 08:35:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Direct link (pdf!) to the study.

  • It comes as something of a surprise that Germany (ranked 8th) is well ahead of France (ranked 15th). What's more, that relationship holds almost across the board in the seven evaluation categories, with France significalty ahead only in "housing and environment". May this be recent development?...

  • Malta comes in dead last -- but, it's the one country for which data is missing in three out of seven evaluation categories. For Cyprus, even four categories are un-ranked, so its 12th place is incomparable too.

  • Belgium is ranked first on education. What's up with this?

  • As I'd expected, among the ex-communist new members, Slovenia is best: ranked 7th (between Denmakr and Germany).


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 02:59:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Why not Belgium? I mean, it's a largely prosperous, small country. Perfect fit for having a good education system. Belgium has some cultural issues but those don't have to affect the quality of education.

The Dutch cliche about Belgian education is that the Belgians only learn facts. That would result in good test results if the tests focus on that (as I'd suspect they do). The other way around the Belgian cliche would be that the Dutch only learn how to BS. I suspect that there's something to both.

by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:40:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Here (pdf!) is the earlier study I mentioned. France is still below Germany, Malta is not there, the U.K. is at the bottom, Belgium is still at the top on education, but health in Italy is much better. Why?

Some other interesting facts from that study (they have some data from non-European countries as well):

  • Percentage of children age 15 reporting less than 10 books in the home: lowest in the Czech republic, highest in Portugal, followed by the Netherlands and the U.S.
  • Low birth weight: Japan, followed by Hungary. Russia has reasonable birth weight but is a spectacular outlier on infant mortality. For deaths from accidents and injuries, Russia is also an outlier, but Israel is even worse.
  • Percentage of 15 year-olds whose parents spend time `just talking to  them' several times per week: Hungary is the best, closely followed by Italy. Germany would be worst, if they hadn't included data from Israel.
  • On the other hand, "Percentage of young people age 11, 13 and 15 who find their peers kind and helpful", is best in Switzerland, with the U.K. being worst.
  • You didn't really need a study to tell you that for "Percentage of students age 11, 13 and 15 who  report having been drunk two or more times" is the highest in the U.K., far ahead of even Finland?
  • by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 04:59:32 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    gk:
  • On the other hand, "Percentage of young people age 11, 13 and 15 who find their peers kind and helpful", is best in Switzerland, with the U.K. being worst.
  • You didn't really need a study to tell you that for "Percentage of students age 11, 13 and 15 who  report having been drunk two or more times" is the highest in the U.K., far ahead of even Finland?
  • Can't be fun to be a child in the UK...

    Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 05:23:27 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    it was hellish...

    'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
    by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 09:13:00 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Well, you did go to "public" school...

    Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 09:49:43 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Low birth weight: Japan, followed by Hungary. Russia has reasonable birth weight but is a spectacular outlier on infant mortality. For deaths from accidents and injuries, Russia is also an outlier, but Israel is even worse.

    In broad comparisons of this nature, time lags in reporting could be very large. For example, the pdf claims that for non-OECD countries infant mortality data are as of 2003. But for Russia, according to the WHO data, 16 infant deaths per 1000 live births is the data point for year 2000. In 2003, it was more like 13. In 2008 it was 10, projections for 2009 give 8.2 so far (see here, the data only in Russian).

    by Sargon on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 09:32:53 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    "Sauerland cell" trial opens in Duesseldorf | Germany | Deutsche Welle | 22.04.2009
    One of Germany's biggest terrorism trials is underway this Wednesday. The authorities have accused four men of plotting a series of terror attacks, on a scale comparable with the London and Madrid bombings. 

    The Sauerland cell was named after a region in western Germany where police seized three terrorism suspects in September 2007, along with hundreds of kilos of bomb-making materials. The fourth suspect was arrested in Turkey and extradited to Germany last November.

    The four men, whose ages range between 23 and 30, are accused of planning to bomb discos, restaurants, airports, the Federal Prosecutors' Office, and US army installations, in a spate of attacks allegedly planned for October 2007.

    The bombings were to take place across Germany, from the American base at Ramstein to cities such as Dortmund, Düsseldorf, Frankfurt, Cologne and Munich.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:00:13 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Turkey arrests terrorists suspects, gets boost for EU bid | Europe | Deutsche Welle | 21.04.2009
    Both the current and future EU president countries have come out in support of Ankara's bid for membership. Meanwhile, Turkish police detained more than 30 people suspected of ties to al-Qaeda.  

    Turkey's Anatolia news agency reported on Tuesday that anti-terrorist authorities detained 37 individuals in early morning raids in five provinces. The agency added that seven of the suspects were thought to have received armed training in militant camps in Afghanistan.

    A Turkish newspaper reported in March that Ankara had been given intelligence from the US that al Qaeda was possibly planning attacks in Turkey.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:00:34 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Time running out for Croatia's EU reforms - EUobserver

    EUOBSERVER / ZAGREB - The structural reforms Croatia still needs to carry out are more likely to hold up its EU membership bid than the current border dispute with Slovenia, a senior EU official has warned.

    "I would be more concerned about structural reforms [in Croatia]" than about the border dispute, Vincent Degert, head of the European Commission's delegation in Croatia told a group of journalists in Zagreb on Monday (20 April).

    Croatia wants to enter the EU by 2011, but reforms - in the agriculture sector, among others - could cause problems

    Mr Degert spoke about justice reform, as well as the need to restructure Croatia's shipyards and the agriculture sector, as some of the key areas where progress is still needed.

    "These are the hardcore reforms," he said, with Croatia hoping to finish membership negotiations within the next eight months and enter the EU by 2011.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:01:12 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Internet piracy battle holds up EU telecoms bill - EUobserver

    UOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The battle between internet pirates and copyright holders shifted to Strasbourg this week, with a move that threatens to hold up a major European Union telecoms bill and unravel France's flagship legislation on cutting off internet access for illegal downloaders.

    MEPs in the European Parliament's industry committee on Tuesday (21 April) passed an amendment to the telecoms bill requiring that internet cut-offs can only be put in place after a decision by judicial authorities.

    Internet piracy is turning into a key issue for young voters ahead of the June elections

    The bill itself is a much broader legislative initiative that aims to substantially reform the European telecoms sector, focusing on infrastructure rather than content, with both parliament and EU member states largely in agreement on the package.

    But last September, MEPs overwhelmingly backed a similar amendment that intended to put a stop to France's "three strikes law," under which copyright scofflaws would see their internet stopped for up to a year.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:01:44 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    And what's up with net neutrality?

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.
    by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:02:57 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    AP via OregonLive.com: Pirate Bay lawyer demands retrial (4/23/2009)

    A defense lawyer in the Pirate Bay file-sharing case says he will demand a retrial after media reports that the judge was a member of a copyright protection organization.

    Four men behind the notorious Web site were convicted of helping others commit copyright violations and were given one-year prison sentences last week.

    Swedish Radio reported Thursday that Judge Tomas Norstrom is a member of a Swedish copyright group and that two people who represented the entertainment industry during the trial also are members of the organization.



    Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 05:25:50 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    British M.P.'s May Lose Residence Perk - NYTimes.com

    LONDON -- After a string of embarrassing revelations about expense claims by members of Parliament, Prime Minister Gordon Brown proposed Tuesday that the expense-account system be overhauled "to restore people's confidence that M.P.'s are there to serve the public and not themselves."

    Legislators in the House of Commons are the beneficiaries of an array of perks and reimbursements, all of them perfectly legal, for expenses associated with running their offices, traveling between London and their districts, and having homes in both places. Members of Parliament earn base salaries of $92,795. In a recent 12-month period, they claimed an average of nearly $200,000 in expenses.

    It emerged this month that the home secretary, Jacqui Smith, regularly claims that her sister's house in London, where she rents a room when Parliament is in session, is her primary residence. That has allowed Ms. Smith to draw the equivalent of tens of thousands of dollars in the so-called second-home allowance for the house in Worcestershire, where her family lives and where she lives during weekends and the long stretches when Parliament is not sitting.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:07:47 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    No, they are losing one set of perks and replacing them with another set. It's classic distraction.

    They have been caught with their hands in the till too often, so they have to be seen to wear the hair shirt of contrition for a bit. Then once the dust has settled and we all look away, they';ll simply be at it again, only in a different way.

    there is no chance, no chance at all, that the gravy train will be derailed.

    keep to the Fen Causeway

    by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:55:49 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Shouldn't Jacqui Smith resign over this?

    Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:59:38 PM EST
    [ Parent ]

    Nicolas Sarkozy spends £157m on keeping up with the presidential jet set - Times Online

    The ignominy is evidently too much to bear. When he flies to international summits President Sarkozy is confronted by a number of private jets that dwarf his French Airbus A319.

    Even the Spanish and German leaders arrive in bigger aircraft, let alone Barack Obama's mighty Air Force One.

    Next month work will begin on a project to give Mr Sarkozy wings in keeping with his ambitions when French engineers take possession of an aircraft that will be turned into an ultra-modern presidential airliner.

    Although not quite as big as the Boeing 747-200 that is Air Force One, the French A330-200 will be at least ten metres longer and two metres higher that the aircraft used by other European leaders. It will also be far more luxurious -- as befits a man who called Mr Obama inexperienced, questioned the intellect of José Luis Rodríguez Zapatero, the Spanish Prime Minister, and disparaged Angela Merkel, the German Chancellor, in comments to MPs last week.

    [Murdoch Alert]
    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:08:18 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    I don't know about the [Murdoch Alert] addition but it's definitely a short-man/small dick psychology at work.

    Question for you folks: Now that the US seems to have come to it's right mind and elected Obama, when will you follow suit?  You seem to still be living with the Bush leftovers while we're moving ahead.  What politicians are in the pipeline?

    They tried to assimilate me. They failed.

    by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 03:19:14 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Waddaya mean ? There is no difference between an Atlanticist bushie and an atlanticist Obaman. It the Atlanticist genuflection that is the major problem.

    keep to the Fen Causeway
    by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:58:38 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    OK.  So when are you going to get leaders who will lead YOUR people and not just cow-tow to your overlords?  Is that better phrased?

    They tried to assimilate me. They failed.
    by THE Twank (yatta blah blah @ blah.com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 08:28:47 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Fears of EU split as 'last dictator' of Belarus is invited to summit | World news | The Guardian

    An attempt by Europe to bring its "last dictator" in from the cold by inviting Alexander Lukashenko, the Belarussian president, to a summit of 27 EU government leaders could backfire by aggravating EU divisions, it was feared yesterday.

    Many European leaders are hoping that Lukashenko - who has been in power for 15 years, has been blacklisted by Brussels on account of his authoritarian rule and was until recently subject to a travel ban - will not take up the invitation to the Prague summit on 7 May.

    The summit is to launch the EU's new "eastern partnership" policy with six former Soviet bloc states, aimed at increasing Brussels' clout in the region at the expense of Moscow's.

    Lukashenko, head of the most isolated state in Europe, has been invited together with the leaders of Ukraine, Georgia, Armenia, Azerbaijan and Moldova. The Czech foreign minister, Karel Schwarzenberg, delivered the invitation in person to Belarus's president in Minsk on Friday.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:10:17 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    France 24 | Fillon says Continental protesters should face charges | France 24
    French Prime Minister Francois Fillon has warned that hundreds of workers at the Continental tyre company who trashed a government building on Tuesday to protest planned layoffs should face charges, calling their acts "unacceptable".

    AFP - Prime Minister Francois Fillon warned Wednesday that workers who vented their anger by trashing a government building should face charges, as fears grew of French labour unrest turning violent.
       
    Workers from the German-owned Continental tyre company went on a rampage Tuesday after a court refused to block the company's decision to shut down their factory and scrap 1,200 jobs.
       
    A few hundred employees ransacked offices of the regional administration in Compiegne, northeast of Paris, smashing windows, overturning desks and wrecking computers.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:11:34 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    MEPs approve softer version of energy law - EUobserver

    EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The European Parliament has approved a watered-down version of an energy package aimed at further liberalising the bloc's electricity and gas markets, while strengthening consumer rights.

    Initially targeting full separation of transmission and production activities in energy giants like E.ON or GDF - also known as "unbundling" - the compromise approved on Wednesday (22 April) by the European Parliament gives big energy players the option of keeping the two types of activities, but under stronger supervision.

    Electricity transmission networks

    The EU goal is to facilitate network access for smaller energy companies without their own grids, as well as to ease up cross-border investments and trade in EU's €300 billion electricity and gas market, which is still fragmented by national barriers.

    "The package will give the EU a clear regulatory framework needed to ensure a properly functioning internal market and to promote much needed investment, especially by cross-border and regional cooperation," EU energy commissioner Andris Piebalgs told MEPs in a plenary debate ahead of the vote.

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:13:07 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Cos de-regulation and increased competition have worked so well .....

    keep to the Fen Causeway
    by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 04:59:54 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    This is actually good - rather than force unbundling they treat vertically integrated companies as regulated monopolies.

    Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 05:01:16 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Before even considering unbundling of transmission from generation they should look at the fiasco in California in the '90s, complete with Enron traders joking how they were going to screw those California "grannies."  Regulated monopolies are FAR better.  The real alternative would be an EU wide single transmission system owned and operated by the Union.

    "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
    by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 10:31:07 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Hmm-mmm, I have to look at the details to pass judgement. The silly liberalisation goal has not been abandoned yet, and the precise rules might still more benefit the quasi-monopolies than the regulatory intent.

    Plus, there is always the potential problem that a newly created regulatory board will be staffed with people originating in the former monopolies, and just continue their policies while nominally independent.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.

    by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:19:14 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Commission ready to investigate European illegal fishing off Somalia - EUobserver

    EUOBSERVER / BRUSSELS - The European Commission has said it is ready to investigate and take action against any European boats or European-owned fishing companies that fly flags of convenience that engage in illegal fishing off the coast of Somalia.

    This month, Abdirahman Ibbi, the deputy prime minister and minister of fisheries and marine resources in the new Somali national unity government, said that an estimated 220 foreign-owned vessels were still engaged in unlicensed and illegal fishing in Somali waters, most of them of European origin.

    Commissioner Borg is ready to investigate allegations of European illegal fishing in Somali waters if presented with evidence

    The European commissioner for fisheries, Joe Borg, on Wednesday (22 April) told reporters that he had no information regarding Mr Ibbi's allegation.

    "I am certainly prepared to look into it if we are provided with specific details on this," he said during a press conference presenting a paper reviewing the state of the European Common Fisheries Policy. "But the information I have is that it is nowhere near close to those figures that have been mentioned."

    by Fran on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:13:50 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    hahahahahaha. How beautifully corrupt.

    keep to the Fen Causeway
    by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 05:00:56 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    While they are at it, perhaps they could investigate the provenance of those barrels of radio-active waste alleged to have been dumped in those same waters.  Surely the EU has the means to retrieve a representative sample of those barrels.

    "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
    by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 10:34:00 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    he could also regulate fishing of the EU fleet in the international waters of West Africa...
    by Nomad on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:28:42 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Budget 2009: Energy efficiency spend will barely reduce carbon emissions, say green groups | Environment | guardian.co.uk

    Building firms and green groups welcomed the budget announcement to spend £375m on energy efficiency in buildings over the next two years, but said it was much too little to kickstart an ailing construction industry and would barely reduce carbon emissions.

    The chancellor Alistair Darling said that energy efficiency - stopping heat leaking out of buildings - was "the easiest and quickest" way to reduce carbon emissions and the benefits would be distributed between homes, offices and public buildings.

    "These measures will support employment and save 380,000 tonnes of CO2 and around £60m in energy bills each year," said the full budget report. The UK emits 531m tonnes of CO2 a year, making the total savings 0.14%.

    Greenpeace dismissed the measures as "woeful". "The emissions saved per year represent about two weeks' emissions from Radcliffe-on-Soar coal-powered station - Britain's third biggest power station," said the environment group's spokesperson.



    The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
    by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 02:55:32 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    BBC: British police officers who conceal ID face sack

    Officers who deliberately conceal their identification numbers will face the sack, Britain's top policeman has said.

    Metropolitan Police Commissioner Sir Paul Stephenson said it was "totally unacceptable" not to wear the numerals.

    His comments follow allegation against several officers at the G20 protests - including the man who pushed newspaper seller Ian Tomlinson before he died.

    New footage has emerged of the moments leading up to his death, as a third post-mortem examination was held.

    The footage is in the link.  It doesn't support the police claim that there was a confrontation prior to the attack.

    by Sassafras on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 06:01:45 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Does that include the inspector, who was confronted about not showing his ID numbers at the demo? and refused?

    or all of the police at Brightlingsea? or the police at Ourgreve colliery?

    is that a "Faces getting the sack but its never going to happen in practice once the current thing dies down"

    Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

    by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Apr 22nd, 2009 at 07:40:39 PM EST
    [ Parent ]
    It's fun to read of this still happening in "civilised" Britain -- two and a half years after the visibility of policeman identification numbers was such a big issue at the first riots in Budapest.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.
    by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:21:58 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    That BBC video almost crashed my computer. I recommend the version uploaded to YouTube instead.



    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.

    by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:53:08 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Me silly, embedding disabled. Here is the link.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.
    by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 03:55:34 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Ryanair may charge a `fat tax' for its overweight passengers | Independent | 23.4.09
    First there was the `wee fee', then the charge for the privilege of checking-in, now it seems budget airline Ryanair has finally tipped the scales by announcing it is considering a fat tax.

    But, just when you thought they couldn't possibly take this any further, there's more.

    The company needs customers' help to figure out how to charge the fat tax and its offering the following options:

    Charge per kg over 130kg/20 stone (male) and 100kg/15 stone (females).

    Charge per inch for every waist inch over 45 inch (male) and 40 inch (female).

    Charge for every point in excess of 40 points on the Body Mass Index (+30 points is obese).

    Charge for a second seat if passengers' waist touches both armrests simultaneously.

    Stephen McNamara, spokesman for Ryanair, explained the four options being offered appeared to be the "simplest".

    by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 06:35:14 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Ryanair's principle: a human body transported in a Ryanair plane experiences an upwards ticket price pressure proportional to the volume of freight displaced from the cargo bay.

    Most economists teach a theoretical framework that has been shown to be fundamentally useless. -- James K. Galbraith
    by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 06:39:51 AM EST
    [ Parent ]
    Well, what can I say... you know I am SOOO sorry about budget airline passengers...

    ...you can always holiday in Devon or take Eurostar.

    *Lunatic*, n.
    One whose delusions are out of fashion.

    by DoDo on Thu Apr 23rd, 2009 at 06:51:34 AM EST
    [ Parent ]

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