Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
What defines culture? One can belong to several cultures at the same time. I, for instance, belong to the European culture and the physicist culture at the same time. I have cultural identifiers (slang, mannerisms, sense of propriety, in-jokes, etc.) in common with a Japanese or Congolese physicist that I do not share with my fellow Europeans. Similarly, I have cultural identifiers in common with Europeans that I do not share with a fellow physicist who happens to be American or Bolivian.

What you share is not the actual experience of spirituality - that would require telepathic powers. You share a set of expressions that are, agreed to denote expression of spiritual experiences. I would argue, in other words, that you share a (sub)culture. That subcultures cross the bounds of "major" cultures is not an unbearable surprise - as we saw above, the physics subculture is world-wide and touches upon many different cultural spheres.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Fri Jun 5th, 2009 at 06:54:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Others have rated this comment as follows:

Display:

Occasional Series