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A late add-on to this:

  1. The curve-going problem of the international SNCF Prima I (series [4]37000), i.e. the flanges hitting the rail profile, was mitigated in the version for Veolia (series 437500). I don't know if they applied the change in the international version 475000, but, given that they are in delivery now, I suspect they did.

  2. With some search starting from a recent news, I learnt that the 475000 will have 2.4 MW MTU R43 engines (the same as in the Bombardier TRAXX DE F140) starting from 475133.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Jul 14th, 2009 at 01:02:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I should also add: there won't be an awful lot of applications left for the SNCF international diesels. Apart from services for big industrial customers with nonelectrified access tracks:

  • The lightly used Strasbourg-Lauterbourg-Wörth/Germany line (check French electrification map) will be the only transit line for the 475000. (AFAIK Saarbrücken-Sarreguemines only sees freight traffic of local nature, e.g. the mining/steel industry just across the border.)

  • In Belgium, part of the Antwerp port railway remains, but not for much longer.

  • The "Iron Rhine" from Antwerp to Germany across the Southern tip of the Netherlands, if and when the Dutch-German section is re-opened, could stay catenary-free for a few years.

I don't know if SNCF also wants to go to the Netherlands, but there, the use of the ready-installed electrification of the harbour access of the Betuweroute is delayed to the end of this year only because of signalling (ETCS again...); other than that, there is Groningen-Leer/Germany in the North (map).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue Jul 14th, 2009 at 01:34:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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