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And so ends the German sustainability experiment.  I blame corporate control of the media, as in amurka, and completely incompetent old people controlling the SPD.

This is really bitter and i have nothing intelligent to say.  Except beware of Guido Westerwelle, it's as if the Financial Times won the election.  I say that from the background of my ex-inlaws being FDP powers.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin

by Crazy Horse on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:17:16 PM EST
Westerwelle wants to follow in the footsteps of Genscher so he'll go to the Auswärtiges Amt. As for the sustainability experiment and all the rest, you can block a lot while being in the opposition. The parties on the left now have to look to May 2010 and try to get into the government again in NRW. They also have to try to form coalitions in Thuringia, Saarland and Schleswig-Holstein.

In the end I think this election bodes worse for the rights of the German labourer and the privatisation of further public services than for the green sector.

by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:24:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The CDU wants to cut photovoltaics feed-in rates, that much is already clear.

the rights of the German labourer and the privatisation of further public services

On this front, I wonder just how much hypocrisy the CSU will allow itself. (My guess: an incredible amount...)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:27:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As we figured earlier, any major changes to the renewable energies law will have to go through the Landestag. Solar can bear a further cut as long as it's negotiated with the sector (and not a post-hoc cut on the existing capacity).

The CSU, at least, would also have to be hypocritical (and against the long-term interests of Bavaria) to go along with the CDU and FDP without objection.

My guess is that labour law will be up first, selling off the Deutsche Bahn afterwards (but they need a 'favourable market environment' for that). Plus the extention of the running time of the nuclear plants, they should try to get that in early, too.

by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:35:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
will have to go through the Landestag

Bundesrat, you meant. Ah, I forgot about that, even though IIRC I dug it up...

The CSU, at least, would also have to be hypocritical (and against the long-term interests of Bavaria) to go along with the CDU and FDP without objection.

But it will be funny (funny in a dark sense) if they want to play protector of the people against the FDP while their own little neolib is making policy as economy minister.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:39:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Landestag

eeehm... Bundesrat would be the right word...

by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:39:40 PM EST
[ Parent ]
On the other hand, the regional parliaments have relevance when it comes to zoning laws. So NRW will be crucial.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:41:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It's just that i always include the "rights of the German labourer and the (non) privatisation of further public services" as a key part of my version of Green.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:28:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Fair enough, and I agree with you on that. I don't think this is the end, though. More an interruption.
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:42:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This is the worse economic time for this, though. Germany is set at best for jobless recovery and at worse for deepening recession.

En un viejo pas ineficiente, algo as como Espaa entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 03:36:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
When bad things happen, it's always the Left's fault. So it won't be Germany's new overlords who get the blame.
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 05:09:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
To a large extent the SPD is at fault, so at least that part of the election result is understandable...

En un viejo pas ineficiente, algo as como Espaa entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 05:12:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I would think Westerwelle is bound to take the AA whatever his wishes may be because according to protocol that's the second-highest office after the Chancellorship. What kind of a figure this maturity-challenged opportunist will cut on the world stage is another story...

The new government will not go after workers' rights until after the NRW elections next May (that is, not if they care about getting the CDU-led coalition re-elected). Rüttgers works pretty hard at keeping up relations with labor and has declared himself a support of codetermination. Any move before them will both undercut CDU support and undermine Rüttgers' credibility personally.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:40:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I´m not a fan of Westerwelle. But I must admit I would like to see him visiting the USA and meeting with Republican politicians. :)
by Detlef (Detlef1961_at_yahoo_dot_de) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 03:47:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I blame corporate control of the media, as in amurka, and completely incompetent old people controlling the SPD.

From the day the Schröderite old guard staged its coup against Beck, this was to be expected. The SPD demolished itself, and listening to that media was another symptom of their incompetence.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:24:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And i also blame the Greens for not taking advantage of the financial crisis.

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:25:26 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think they've allowed environmental issues to become lifestyle issues for a certain clientèle, one that hasn't been hurt too much by the GFC.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:34:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
GFC?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Anas Nin
by Crazy Horse on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:36:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great Financial Crisis?

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:40:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Great Financial Crisis.

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 01:41:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Global Financial Crisis
by nanne (zwaerdenmaecker@gmail.com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 02:01:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I like GCF better: Great Clusterfuck.

En un viejo pas ineficiente, algo as como Espaa entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 03:23:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I like it, though it sounds vaguely incestuous.

Although that is probably the point...

The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt t gmail dotcom) on Sun Sep 27th, 2009 at 04:07:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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