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There is a reason France has been so persistently demonised in the business press, and pushed to "reform": its largely State-coordinated system DOES provide an attractive alternative.

Yes. Following this line of thought, I've been trying to put together a clear picture of this state coordinated system, and more importantly the genesis of that system for a long time- a picture that could be rationally and persuasively flogged to my American friends and, more widely, in a book that's partially written now. Unfortunately it's taken a back seat to another, more immediate project, but I'll get back to it.
The question I've asked (and never gotten a thorough answer to) is this: How did the idea that health care is a human right become a dominant element in the social narrative here?
Melanchthon has helped, but I need a broader sample of opinion.

As well, there's ample evidence that well-run state-directed economies or businesses can perform very well, thank you, and indeed have some advantages. Yet the mantra of the evils of state planning permeate much of our discussion here. Too weird.

Capitalism searches out the darkest corners of human potential, and mainlines them.

by geezer in Paris (risico at wanadoo(flypoop)fr) on Sun Oct 4th, 2009 at 05:46:12 AM EST
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At one point, most of the right wing (and a bit of the left) was quite thoroughly discredited for having collaborated with a rather evil foreign occupant. The resulting forces, being in power after the war, pretty much rewrote the French society from scratch, with the national health care thing included. (and actually, only for workers)

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Sun Oct 4th, 2009 at 05:51:40 PM EST
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