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I am writing from within a judaeo-christian cultural framework. I was brought up in a Christian society, and very largely share the values that Christians share among themselves (i.e. not the more extreme ones).

As for the Judaeo- bit, I frankly didn't get it from any religious tradition, but from 20th century cosmopolitan culture, which bears a very heavy Jewish influence, and which I embrace unreservedly.

Though having no religious beliefs myself, I respect those who do. Some of my best friends are Christians. Others are Moslems. Some are gay. None of that is a problem. Unless they try to shove it down your throught, eh.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Oct 18th, 2010 at 05:03:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But that's basically my problem with this whole concept. What are the values that are specifically Jewish and Christian and are not common to most civilised societies?  Most of what we think of as specifically Western ideas, such as separation of Church and State, modern science, democracy, or even, I'm afraid, NCE, were achieved against strong opposition from the established religions.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Oct 19th, 2010 at 01:48:26 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It helps to be aware of it, when you're dealing with people from, say, a Taoist or Islamic or Hindu cultural background, who don't have the same cultural reflexes as me. It's more about ways of thinking than about outcomes, if you see what I mean.

Universalism is a fine goal, but we've all got to sublimate a lot of cultural baggage (much of it pure bullshit) before we can get there.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Oct 19th, 2010 at 03:48:27 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It also helps to be aware of it when dealing with people from a Jewish (especially Sephardic) cultural background. But that's my main point: if you had used "Christian" in a vague cultural sense, I wouldn't have had any problem with it (though I might have looked carefully to make sure there wasn't anything else behind it...). But the singling out of the Jewish component as though it was an equal contributor makes me suspicious. Sure, there was Jewish influence on Christianity. But there were also inputs from pagan ritual, Greek philosophy, not to mention Islam.
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Oct 19th, 2010 at 03:58:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
eurogreen:
Universalism is a fine goal, but we've all got to sublimate a lot of cultural baggage (much of it pure bullshit) before we can get there.

noble, realistic sentiment, finely expressed!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue Oct 19th, 2010 at 05:50:41 AM EST
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