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Sorry, misread the 120$ per week as 120$ per month. But PPP is a poor adjuster if it considers comparable 7.5$ in the US and 3$ in Vietnam. For similar standard of living, and considering the differences in mandatory costs between the US and Vietnam, 120$ is closer to granting the same social status in Vietnam as that of a Walmart worker in the US.

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères
by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Nov 8th, 2010 at 11:06:29 AM EST
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PPP is simply based on prices, so it says nothing about social status. And are you saying that food, energy, transport and housing (the primary expenses for most households) are more than two and a half time cheaper in Vietnamese urban areas than in generic American sub/exurbia or rural areas?  Given the cost and necessity of cars, I wouldn't be surprised if you have a point, but cars do offer a rather big increase in quality of life to anyone who doesn't live in a very high density urban area with great public transport above and beyond the basic necessity aspect.  Also, it's not like the other stuff is a minor matter.  
by MarekNYC on Mon Nov 8th, 2010 at 11:32:12 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm pretty certain that food, energy, transport and housing is more than two and a half time cheaper in Vietnam than in rural US. The street restaurant serves a meal for about 75 cents, transport is done by motorbike (which you can get for a few hundred bucks, and are used all across VietNam, even the most rural parts ; after a few weeks in Vietnam, you start wondering exactly what's the point of a SUV, since the average motorbike has exactly the same uses), energy means a ventilator for A/C and some coal for cooking (plus more electricity for the TV, an impressive amount of which are large and flat) - the real expense is housing, which will require a 200$/month rental if you aren't a homeowner ; note that most people of Hanoi origins got the land (and potentially the house) for free at the time of de-collectivisation.

Another point ; you'll find quite a lot of westerners settling for 500$ to 800$ a month in Vietnam. The only problem is that a few years later they realise they can't buy a plane ticket to go back West...

Un roi sans divertissement est un homme plein de misères

by linca (antonin POINT lucas AROBASE gmail.com) on Mon Nov 8th, 2010 at 12:15:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
$2000 a month ($800 x.2.5) in actual average spending will provide a quite adequate standard of living in much of the US for a childless single person absent health care costs.  
by MarekNYC on Mon Nov 8th, 2010 at 12:37:21 PM EST
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