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DoDo: If they send their own children abroad, then they believe you can't.

That's one possible explanation.  It would imply that those parents believed Vietnamese universities to provide superior education than Chinese universities.  That's also possible.

Another possibility is that those parents had some personal or professional connection to Vietnam and wanted their children to be exposed to that country.  Another possibility is that they wanted their children to have an international university experience in whatever country they could.  Another possibility is that the students themselves wanted to have an international university experience.  Another possibility is that those students did not get accepted into a Chinese university that they (or their parents) deemed prestigious enough, and felt that going to school overseas would be a better option than going to a less prestigious school.  (This last explanation was the case with a Beijing woman I know who is the daughter of a very powerful "apparatchik": she was not able to enter any of the three art schools she wanted to go to in China, so she went to study design in England.)

The march of civilizations is a series of defenses that man has put up against the dread of pure existence.

by marco on Sat Feb 6th, 2010 at 08:21:26 AM EST
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Another possibility is that you're getting out of your way to rationalise innocent intentions into the behaviour of apparatchiks.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Feb 6th, 2010 at 08:30:51 AM EST
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Migeru: Another possibility is that you're getting out of your way to rationalise innocent intentions into the behaviour of apparatchiks.

Do you have any evidence you would like to offer that most Chinese "apparatchiks" whose children study outside of China send or allow their children to do so because they believe they can't get a decent education in China?  Or are you satisfied to favor this particular explanation based (as far as I can tell) on pure speculation?  Also, do you happen to have data on what percentage of Chinese "apparatchiks"' children study overseas?

The march of civilizations is a series of defenses that man has put up against the dread of pure existence.

by marco on Sat Feb 6th, 2010 at 08:51:12 AM EST
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are you satisfied to favor this particular explanation based (as far as I can tell) on pure speculation?

I guess I am. But I don't believe the Chinese are less hypocritical than others - they're human, too. And the phenomenon of people educated in public education (or even in charge of public education) who send their children to private education at home or abroad is too pervasive to ignore and, yes, it is hypocritical.

En un viejo país ineficiente, algo así como España entre dos guerras civiles, poseer una casa y poca hacienda y memoria ninguna. -- Gil de Biedma

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Feb 6th, 2010 at 09:05:07 AM EST
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