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I'm assuming the diary is tongue-in-cheek.

On business grounds: The World Cup is one of the biggest events in the world.

Whereas nobody outside of Canada cares about the NHL.  (Yes, redstar, I know they care in Minnesota.  But let's be honest: Minnesota is just Canada with assault rifles.)  The NHL is chaotic, weaponized American football for pasty white people who make your average NBA player sound literate.

As far as Chicago goes, you'd force yourself to celebrate, too, if your alternatives were cheering for the Cubs and hoping Jay Cutler might avoid throwing a hundred picks next season.

Getting back to soccer.  I've come to appreciate it more.  The low score of US-England didn't bother me at all.

What strikes me as odd is the second-by-second change in possession and the occasionally random-looking way the ball is kicked into a group of people, to the point that it can be tough to get a good grasp of momentum and strategy at times unless it's a pretty dominant showing.  But I'm getting it.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 06:39:28 PM EST
But hockey has a puck that's nearly invisible most of the time and impossible to see when shot on goal. And yet millions of white people (and Dustin Byflugien) appear to enjoy the sport. Imagine soccer played with cricket bats and black golf balls, and try to make that popular. Sports marketing people have succeeded in northern North America, Czech-o-Slovakia and Russia. Why, because they score not too many (like basketball) but a lot of goals. Each goal is meaningful so there are 7 or 10 ecstatic celebrations per game (instead of one or two as at World Cup soccer). Not that I enjoy the game.

And no, only some of this is tongue-in-cheek. 1.6 goals per game, come on! We're really reaching a crisis here.

fairleft

by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 06:50:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sports marketing people have succeeded in northern North America, Czech-o-Slovakia and Russia. Why, because they score not too many (like basketball) but a lot of goals.

No, it's because it snows a lot in those countries. You forgot to mention Scandinavia, too. And I can't believe you spelled Czech-o-Slovakia, specially 20 years after the country ceased to exist...

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 06:58:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That should've been Czech-or-Slovakia.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 11:56:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
We're really reaching a crisis here.

Who 'we'?

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 07:00:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Everyone who sees what's happening.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 12:14:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As pointed out elsewhere in this thread, actual soccerfootball fans are usually more concerned with referee errors than with goal averages.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:14:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
As I pointed out, the importance of referee errors diminishes when there are more goals scored. So far, we have a roughly 30% in goals compared just to World Cup 2006. Since there is now an average of 1.7 goals per game, I predict this World Cup will be the worst ever for refs deciding matches. Or best ever, apparently, because most here seem to have no problem with the 1.7 goal average.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 11:15:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Should say "roughly 30% DECREASE in goals"

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 12:12:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
the importance of referee errors diminishes when there are more goals scored

Just ask about NBA basketball...

Other topic: does it matter that all 1.7x goals look very much the same?

by das monde on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 11:10:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I suspect that's an almost entirely-American view, and I doubt even the vast majority of Americans would agree with it.

It's a view that tends towards a lack of appreciation for defense and strategy.  Same way people who don't care about the sports much want to see home runs in baseball and high scores with lots of passing in American football.

That's basically wishing they'd throw half the game out.

It's also a view that tends to glorify the overpaid prettyboys instead of the guys who do the really hard work.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 09:23:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
My sense is that a balance between offense and defense is what most baseball and American football fans want. We are experiencing a 30% drop in goals this year from 2006, now down to 1.6 or 1.7 goals per match. I can't quite believe that the imbalance doesn't irritate most everyone who isn't an extremely stout traditionalist. Especially because the paucity of goals very much increases the importance of refereeing errors, and we know there will be many of those. No one, I assume (too much), likes bad calls deciding matches.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 11:18:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
One thing you maybe haven't taken into account is that the first round of games is always lower scoring than average. teams tend to pay more conservatively, because a defeat at this stage can make it much harder to qualify for later stages of the competition. A draw however does not puncture a teams hopes for the later stages of the competition.  From now on teams will have to play a more attacking style to avoid elimination, which will open up defences more, and ensure more goals.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 02:02:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In addition, teams are testing the waters. Now that everyone has seen the other teams play they can adapt their play to their opponents, etc.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:38:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Sports marketing people have succeeded in northern North America, Czech-o-Slovakia and Russia.

I've never seen it written "Czech-o-Slovakia," but in any case, there is no more Czechoslovakia, Senator McCain.

Mig nailed the rest of it.

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 07:10:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
No, McCain's not strong enough against immigration during periods of high unemployment.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 12:15:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe you should move to Arizona where your heart belongs.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:16:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We're all Arizonans now.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 11:19:41 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We may all be unemployed now, but we're not all xenophobes.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 11:36:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Those 'xenophobes' who want the immigration laws enforced usually decide our elections.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 12:14:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Immigration laws enforced" appears to be a Republican talking point:

In any case, one doesn't have to pander to xenophobes or worse just because they are swing voters. There are other hot-button issues that could become the central debating point of an election making other groups the key swing-woters, and in that case pandering to xenophobia is no longer necessary.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 12:22:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That claim most certainly deserves a [citation needed] note. Recent evidence suggests this is simply not the case at all.

Look at the Republican nomination for governor here in California. Steve Poizner ran as the strongest anti-immigrant candidate. Meg Whitman ran as a soft anti-immigrant candidate and refused to endorse Arizona's SB 1070. She won by something like 40 points.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 01:02:46 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Those 'xenophobes' who want the immigration laws enforced usually decide our elections.

Yes, that would certainly explain Obama, Bush, Clinton, Bush, Reagan, Carter....

Be nice to America. Or we'll bring democracy to your country.

by Drew J Jones (pedobear@pennstatefootball.com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 01:08:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Minnesota is just Canada with assault rifles."

Dude, that is some funny stuff! Seriously though, hockey is WAY more fun to watch than Futbal, and my team was out after the first round of the playoffs.

Breathe too hard near an over-dramatic striker and the guy acts like he was hit by sniper fire. Yellow cards are distributed randomly. Goals are more rare than rioting English fans. The best team often loses. And I get distracted by the growing grass.

Winning Lord Stanley's Cup is the hardest accomplishment in all of sports. Goalies covered in Michelin Man protection who have the reflexes of cats. Defensemen who relish skating 10 meters across the ice just to hit you as hard as they can and knock you into plywood and plexiglass. Everyone on the ice wearing razor sharp skates and tumbling every-which-way. And having to do it all again two nights later, for two whole months, after having spent the last 10 months getting into position to do so. Best of all the NHL is a pro league with teams in two countries.

PS- The reason hockey players are pasty white is because they spend their lives in the bowels of modern sports arenas and playing on a freezing cold surface.

Some of the above was tongue-in-cheek.

by US Blues on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 07:37:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh no, Winning the Tour-de France is the hardest accomplishment in Sports

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Jun 14th, 2010 at 09:11:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]
In fact, it's so hard that it's never been done (honestly).

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:31:11 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Do you have any evidence that there was cheating in the first one? (the second one they already started taking the train...)
by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:39:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"in living memory"

In loving memory of Marco Pantani

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:47:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Evwn dishonestly, it's the hardest accomplishment in Sports


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 01:38:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Harder than Race across America? How does one even define "harder" here?

BTW, a French woman is leading in the woman's section right now, riding on a recumbant, It's been going on for 6-7 days so far, and the leaders have about 1.000 miles to go.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 02:42:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
It turns out this question has been asked before. Their website compares RAAM with the Tour de France and with climbing Everest.
The Race Across America is almost 50% longer than the Tour de France. Solo racers will finish in about 10 days, which is half the time of the Tour de France, and will have no rest days. RAAM racers are not allowed to draft or ride in packs. Every solo racer will make their way across the country on their own power with no help with teammates.

Mt. Everest and the Race Across America are entirely different. Austrian adventurer Wolfgang Fasching has won solo RAAM three times and climbed Mt. Everest. In his opinion, - Everest is more dangerous, but RAAM is much harder.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 02:55:57 PM EST
[ Parent ]
But don't pretend you saw Patrick Kane's championship winning goal. Like the rest of us, you had to see it first on instant replay. They need to slow the pucks down so we can enjoy goal scoring as it happens.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 12:00:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Because the fun is not in seeing the puck actually going into the goal but in the movement of the players around the rink.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 04:17:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, now we're talking -- Kim Yu-Na, Mao Asada, Johnny Weir. That's my movement on the ice.

fairleft
by fairleft (fairleftatyahoodotcom) on Tue Jun 15th, 2010 at 11:23:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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