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Straight from Jane Jacobs:

Cities have resource areas from which they draw the raw goods and foodstuffs required for urban living.  Destruction or interdiction of those supplies must adversely affect the ability of the urban area to survive.  Some resources are more vital than others.  For California water is one.  Cut the water and SoCal can't exist for more than a week.  

If the people whose land the California Aqueduct passes have to chose between watering their crops and themselves or letting the water flow on to LA I suspect enough will decide to grab what they can and let LA go hang.  

Even cyberpunks have to drink and, occasionally, take a shower.  ;-)

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Sun Jun 6th, 2010 at 12:54:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Or, they do what is being proposed in the $11 billion water bond on the November ballot, and take water from those with senior rights (farmers in the Sacramento Valley and the east side of the San Joaquin Valley) and give to those with junior rights (farmers in the barren west side of the San Joaquin Valley, and SoCal developers).

The same thing can easily happen within the metropolis. Provide stable deliveries to certain segments of the population - Beverly Hills, Malibu, the Westside, Rancho Santa Margarita - and leave the other, poorer, less white places with less reliable deliveries.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Sun Jun 6th, 2010 at 01:57:01 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The Upper Crust may think they can sequester themselves in their little hide-aways but they really can't.  They aren't dealing with the current reality but Rodeo Drive Reality; a fantasy where bank accounts, business deals, and consumer consumption is some sort of a validating affirmation of their Importance.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Sun Jun 6th, 2010 at 03:26:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree they won't be able to effectively sequester themselves forever. But I certainly expect them to try.

And the world will live as one
by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Sun Jun 6th, 2010 at 05:28:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]
So where does the water come from to keep the numerous Pebble Beach, Pasatiempo, and surrounding areas' golf courses green and gorgeous? Not that golf courses aren't lovely and all that, but I bet they use plenty of water.
by sgr2 on Mon Jun 7th, 2010 at 09:09:21 AM EST
[ Parent ]
California will eventually have to on a war of conquest of the entire Colorado River basin.

By laying out pros and cons we risk inducing people to join the debate, and losing control of a process that only we fully understand. - Alan Greenspan
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jun 7th, 2010 at 09:26:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
They have the entire western watershed of the Sierra Nevadas and could make much better use of existing water. Solar powered desalinization is also an increasingly feasible option. Were they to return to Georgist economics many things would become possible.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Jun 7th, 2010 at 10:22:04 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They got the whole Pacific Ocean at their feet.  They have photovoltaic and wind power potential.  

What they lack is imagination and a willingness to stop digging themselves ever deeper into a mess.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Mon Jun 7th, 2010 at 10:26:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For desalinization photovoltaic appears a poor way in comparison to just using the thermal energy from the sun.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Tue Jun 8th, 2010 at 05:42:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
A solar-thermal or combined solar electirc and solar thermal process might be most efficient. Some interesting work is being done on this on the Arabian Peninsula.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Jun 8th, 2010 at 01:11:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They use the same water system as the rest of the LA basin.  Golf courses may look 'purty' but then use a ton chemicals: herbicides, pesticides, & etc. as well as a many acre feet of water per acre to maintain that look.

"Ton" is not a metaphor nor an exaggeration.

US Golf courses are water wasting toxic stews built and maintained for the oblivious.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Mon Jun 7th, 2010 at 12:09:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Agreed.
by sgr2 on Mon Jun 7th, 2010 at 03:31:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Pebble Beach: overpumping the Carmel River and Seaside aquifer. The entire Monterey Peninsula has been under Stage 1 water rationing since 1999, which so far basically means new development permits are almost impossible to get. The State Water Control Board has ordered reductions in that overpumping by 2014, and so locals are scrambling to build a desalination plant in either Marina or Moss Landing.

Pasatiempo/Santa Cruz: Same thing, overpumping the local watershed and aquifers. They too have probably overshot their carrying capacity and will need to turn to desal.

Just wait until global warming hits with full force and reduces the size of the Sierra snowpack. CA will get more rainfall, but can't store it all. The snowpack is the most important reservoir in the state and the rest of CA is soon going to lose it.

And the world will live as one

by Montereyan (robert at calitics dot com) on Tue Jun 8th, 2010 at 12:59:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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