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njh:
the insistence on building more roads and encouraging car use

These are not necessarily the same.  In fact, in Beijing the government actively tries to reduce the number of cars on the road.

You may find the following somewhat encouraging as well:

China erected more wind turbines in 2009 than any other country and may install a record 18 gigawatts of wind-power capacity in 2010*, Bloomberg New Energy Finance estimates show. ...

China, the world's biggest polluter, may spend about 5 trillion yuan ($738 billion) in the next decade developing cleaner sources of energy to reduce emissions from burning oil and coal, a government official said. ...

The world's fastest-growing major economy will get more than 11 percent of its energy from non-fossil fuels by 2015, according to a statement released by the National Energy Administration today. That compares with about 8 percent currently, Jiang said at a media briefing.

The government wants about 15 percent of its energy to come from non-fossil fuels by 2020.

Coal will meet 63 percent of the nation's energy needs by 2015, down from 70 percent last year, as China increases investment in clean energy, according to the energy administration statement. ...

China May Spend $738 Billion on Clean Energy Projects - BusinessWeek

Encouraging maybe, but maybe too little, too late.

Still, quoting ARGeezer's sig line quoting the embattled Dutch:

     "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

_______

*A lot (though I don't know what percentage) of the wind turbines that are built in China are not immediately connected to the country's electric grid.  However, the government has regulations in place requiring that these "orphaned" wind farms get connected as soon as possible, and that electric power companies source as much energy asthey can from wind turbines as soon as they are accessible.

Tout est pour le mieux dans le meilleur des mondes.

by marco on Mon Aug 2nd, 2010 at 02:51:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
These are not necessarily the same.

Well generally goods are not time sensitive to the same level as passengers, so road improvements overwhelmingly encourage private car use, but only weakly induce truck use.  Trucks go where they are needed, cars trips spread out to make the commute take 45 minutes.

by njh on Mon Aug 2nd, 2010 at 09:43:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
marco:

Still, quoting ARGeezer's sig line quoting the embattled Dutch:

     "It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

This is actually a quote from William of Orange, (yes, a Dutch) who is reported to have said: "One need not hope in order to undertake, nor succeed in order to persevere."

(Often reported in its original French: "Point n'est espérer pour entreprendre, ni de réussir pour persévérer".

by Bernard on Tue Aug 3rd, 2010 at 04:56:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I had been looking for the original source of that quote!

The English Wikiquote page references Edmund Wilson, but the Dutch Wikiquote page provides no source:

     Het is niet nodig te hopen om te ondernemen, noch te slagen om te volharden.

Nomad or Nanne, any idea of the authenticity of this version, or if it's apocryphal?

Tout est pour le mieux dans le meilleur des mondes.

by marco on Tue Aug 3rd, 2010 at 05:26:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He was "from" the province of Orange in south central France, IIRC. I don't know how Orange came by its name or how he came by his Dutch affiliation, but before Louis XIV there were considerable numbers of Protestants scattered about France.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Aug 3rd, 2010 at 10:19:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Orange, Vaucluse - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Roman Orange was founded in 35 BC by veterans of the Second legion[citation needed] as Arausio (after the local Celtic water god), or Colonia Julia Firma Secundanorum Arausio in full, "the Julian colony of Arausio established by the soldiers of the second legion." The name was originally unrelated to that of the orange fruit (Sanskrit nāraṅgaḥ), but was later conflated with it. (see Orange (word))

A previous Celtic settlement with that name existed in the same place and a major battle, which is generally known as the Battle of Arausio, had been fought in 105 BC between two Roman armies and the Cimbri and Teutones tribes.

...

When William the Silent, count of Nassau, with estates in the Netherlands, inherited the title Prince of Orange in 1544, the Principality was incorporated into the holdings of what became the House of Orange-Nassau. This pitched it into the Protestant side in the Wars of Religion, during which the town was badly damaged. In 1568 the Eighty Years' War began with William as stadtholder leading the bid for independence from Spain. William the Silent was assassinated in Delft in 1584. It was his son, Maurice of Nassau (Prince of Orange after his elder brother died in 1618), with the help of Johan van Oldenbarnevelt, who solidified the independence of the Dutch republic. The United Provinces survived to become the Netherlands, which is still ruled by the House of Orange-Nassau. William, Prince of Orange, ruled England as William III of England. Orange gave its name to other Dutch-influenced parts of the world, such as the Orange Free State in South Africa.

The city remained part of scattered Nassau holdings until it was captured by the forces of Louis XIV in 1672 during the Franco-Dutch War, again captured in August 1682 and was finally ceded to France in 1713 under the Treaty of Utrecht that ended the wars of Louis XIV.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Aug 3rd, 2010 at 10:34:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thank you for indulging my sloth.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Aug 3rd, 2010 at 01:47:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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