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It could be that he is talking about but with quotes like this I doubt it:

The Roadmap To A High-Speed Recovery | The New Republic

Between 1980 and 2006, the U.S. economy added some 20 million new jobs in its creative, professional, and knowledge sectors.

Especially if we compare with the metric used in the transition to post-ww2:

The Roadmap To A High-Speed Recovery | The New Republic

By 1940, the number of people employed in R&D had quadrupled, increasing from fewer than 7,000 in 1929 to nearly 28,000 by 1940, according to the detailed historical research of David Mowery and Nathan Rosenberg.


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by A swedish kind of death on Tue Aug 17th, 2010 at 09:08:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
But that's not 20m in R&D ... its all "creative, professional and knowledge" sectors. People employed part time at $18 per contact hour to teach students conned into going into debt on their student loans to pump up the profitability of private two year business colleges are part of that 20m, for instance.

Look at the growth in employment in "creative, professional and knowledge" sectors in the US from 1945 to 1960, as a percentage of the workforce, and the comparison will not seem nearly as dramatic as 21,000 in 11 years versus 20m in 25 years.
 

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Aug 17th, 2010 at 12:19:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I was not comparing the numbers, they just followed with the quotes.

What I meant was that the metric "employment in creative, professional and knowledge sectors" looks to me to be measuring capturing of the production profits through enforcement of various IP-rights. It could be development of production, but when compared with the metric of R&D in R&D labs connected to production as measurement of the post-war eras manufacturing society, I think it is clear that it is not R&D connected to production that he focuses on now.

I would argue that todays IP-funded capturing of production value is the mirror of the outsourcing of the actual production. Through treaties like TRIPS the countries that now houses the manufacturing has been made to accept (for the time being) that a big piece of the value is captured by western design firms. I think this will end soon after the outsourcing trend ends. When China has all the production why accept it?

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Tue Aug 17th, 2010 at 01:56:58 PM EST
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