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There's a more benign explanation for US housing policy to promote ownership too.  The US experience of the Great Depression and earlier recessions were marked by the stirring tragedy of mass homelessness.  People by the millions, with families and children, were pushed out on the streets without homes when they could not pay the ever higher rents.  (Which had to go higher to justify the ever higher costs of building new residences for a growing population.)

The policy solution was to give people more control over their housing through ownership entitlement to their homes instead of through rental contract entitlement, but the problem was that no bank in their right mind would lend more than 5 years out to working homebuyers on modest wages and salaries, and home building prices required mortgages of 20 to 30 years before middle class families could expect to be able to buy and own their own homes.  Thus the federal government created long term mortgages through establishment of secondary market for them by copying the already successful federal farm credit system model of GSEs (government supported enterprises) of a generation earlier, which was itself an adaptation of the 19th century German Landesbank model. Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac were born and to this day remain the only stable market which provides for home mortgages. Despite all the problems such as the recent crisis, mass homelessness has never returned to the pre-1930's levels again.  

by santiago on Fri Aug 27th, 2010 at 06:14:24 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's a cute story, but it does not explain the recent push to expand the "ownership society."

Besides, there's nothing wrong with increasing rent that can't be solved with better public housing provision.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Fri Aug 27th, 2010 at 07:01:27 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's a cute story, but it does not explain the recent push to expand the "ownership society."

There is no reason that the "story" should "explain the push to expand the "ownership society." The story explains an honest attempt to create social stability by provision of a financial service by the government. The "ownership society" was a cynical attempt to extend and justify a developing real estate bubble that would produce economic results that would be politically useful in the short term, particularly the 2004 election.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Aug 27th, 2010 at 11:57:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
You live in the pwn3rship society.

(part of the ET's ClassicalTM Series)

The housing bubble has been indeed very useful: unlike the previous Internet bubble that only enrolled the stock owning people, housing bubble allows to enroll just about everyone. And this "wealth effect" was sorely needed to offset wages than have been stagnant or declining since "Morning in America".

by Bernard on Sat Aug 28th, 2010 at 04:18:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Fanny and Freddie had not led to bubbles -- on their own. But in a prolonged low interest rate environment they ended up holding the bag for an enormous amount of fraudulent credit issuance, all disguised with self regulating lipstick and rouge.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Aug 28th, 2010 at 11:25:29 AM EST
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