Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
to be learned from coalition politics in New Zealand. I'm not suggesting that there's anything to emulate but...

NZ's 120 seat parliament is elected in a system somewhat similar to Sweden's (PR with a 5% cut-off)

There hasn't been a one-party majority for a while. There have been colourful and entertaining negotiations, generally involving centrist parties changing camps. The last election was close, and the current government is a strikingly odd coalition : the main right-wing party with a small far-right coalition partner, and a confidence-and-supply agreement with the Maori Party. They had been part of the left bloc, and sold out in exchange for some specific policy areas. (the Greens had half-heartedly considered some sort of arrangement, but it was never going to fly)

Just saying...

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Tue Sep 21st, 2010 at 12:34:58 PM EST
Oddly, the Australian result, with a Full Preference Single Member Constituency governing house, ended up with similar. 76 for confidence, the Labor party with 72, the Liberal / National Coalition with 72 (the Liberals and Nationals merged in some states, ran in coalition in others, ran out of coalition in Western Austalia), an Independent National and a Green cancelling each other out to 73:73, and four independents deciding the government, one an independent from a Labor leaning Tassie seat elected from third position with Liberal preferences, one the largest Queensland seat in tropical North Queensland, and two Northern NSW Country independents.

Three independents decided to vote confidence and supply for Labor, so they formed government, but the votes to pass anything have to be patched together from Greens, the various union-supported Labor factions, two socially liberal, fiscally conservative independents, one each from notionally Labor and Coalition constituencies, and a fairly socially and fiscally conservative pragmatist who thinks the country will get better broadband internet service from the Labor party.

Its quite a sieve to get policy through.

I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.

by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Sep 21st, 2010 at 08:15:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]


I've been accused of being a Marxist, yet while Harpo's my favourite, it's Groucho I'm always quoting. Odd, that.
by BruceMcF (agila61 at netscape dot net) on Tue Sep 21st, 2010 at 09:10:45 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series