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If you don't see a problem in 26 of the 27 scrapping the current Commission to build a new one against Britain's veto, then I guess you're right, there's no real problem! ;)

I think the point is that this "compact" is being hyped up as a binding treaty to impress the markets (as if), when in fact it never looked like being a full 27-country Lisbon revision, and will not even be a 26-country "treaty" (too much ratification and referendum-type hassle). It will be, at most, an inter-governmental agreement that the Commission is supposed to police (some hope, as the Commission is apparently muttering) and the ECJ rule on (no hope).

So it looks like a turkey for Christmas, but start plucking it and it turns out to be dead crow.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue Dec 13th, 2011 at 09:59:06 AM EST
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If, as seems likely, the Attorney General rules that a Referendum is needed to ratify the "compact" in Ireland - ironically, partly because it is not ceding power to the EU, but to a new 26 country entity - and that the referendum is defeated, as seems even more likely, then the markets are going to be even more impressed. Sarkozy's re-election hopes will be in deep DoDo and Merkel will be a dead woman walking because the exercise of democracy has a way of doing that to ill thought out schemes.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Dec 13th, 2011 at 10:12:05 AM EST
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@economistmeg
Fianna Fail and Sinn Fein calling for Irish referendum on fiscal compact. Even if referendum isn't legally required, politics may require it



tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Dec 13th, 2011 at 11:50:52 AM EST
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I wouldn't be over impressed by opposition parties doing what they are supposed to do - oppose - and positioning themselves "on the side of the people". Referendums in Ireland are called when a constitutional change is deemed necessary to ratify a Treaty. There is never a political reason for calling one, it is always a legal one. It would be an abdication of Government responsibility to call a referendum when none is legally required - but that doesn't prevent the opposition from trying to claim the Government is running away from the people.

Index of Frank's Diaries
by Frank Schnittger (mail Frankschnittger at hot male dotty communists) on Tue Dec 13th, 2011 at 12:20:08 PM EST
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