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There hasn't even been a VP for the better part of the past 30 years...

Keynesianism is intellectually hard, as evidenced by the inability of many trained economists to get it - Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Feb 11th, 2011 at 02:03:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Checked it:

Egypt's Government Services Portal - Egypt Constitution - Chapter Five

Art.84:   In case of the vacancy of the Presidential office or the permanent disability of the President of the Republic, the Speaker of the People's Assembly shall temporarily assume the Presidency. In case the People's Assembly is dissolved at such a time the President of the Supreme Constitutional Court shall take over the Presidency on condition that neither one shall nominate himself for the Presidency. The People's Assembly shall then proclaim the vacancy of the office of President . The President of the Republic shall be chosen within a maximum period of sixty days form the date of the vacancy of the Presidential office.

So if the Assembly is dissolved it is indeed the President of the Supreme Constitutional Court that takes it temporarily and he can not run in the election that shall be held within 60 days.

Upon further reading:

Egypt's Government Services Portal - Egypt Constitution - Chapter Five

Art.76:   The People's Assembly shall nominate the President of the Republic . The nomination shall be referred to the people for a plebiscite. The nomination for the President of the Republic shall be made in the People' Assembly upon the proposal of at least one third of its members. The candidate who obtains two thirds of the votes of the members of the People's Assembly shall be referred to the people for a plebiscite . If he does not obtain the said majority the nomination process shall be repeated two days after the first vote. The candidate obtaining an absolute majority of the votes of the Assembly members shall be referred to the citizens for a plebiscite. The candidate shall be considered President of the Republic when he obtains an absolute majority of votes cast in the plebiscite. If the candidate does not obtain this majority, the Assembly shall propose the nomination of another candidate and the same procedure shall follow concerning his candidature and election.

Wonder how this works when the Assmebly is dissolved?

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by A swedish kind of death on Fri Feb 11th, 2011 at 02:22:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Considering that the members of the existing People's Assembly were selected under long standing "state of emergency" rules which were designed to insure only Mubarak supporters were likely to vote, it is a blessing, (multi-lingual pun intended), if the Assembly is dissolved. I read that the reason Mubarak turned power over to a military council was to avoid the necessity of having an election in 60 days and to allow for preparations for a fairer, broader based election. That may or may not be the case, but six months seems a much more reasonable time frame to organize new parties and an election. I imagine most Egyptians view their constitution as a work very much in process just now.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Feb 11th, 2011 at 05:39:15 PM EST
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