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ceebs:
believes radioactive elements from melted nuclear fuel have found their way
What obfuscation...

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 08:37:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I particularly like the line about "temporarily melted" fuel rods.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 08:52:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
When they cool down they solidify...

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 08:56:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Corium?

"Life shrinks or expands in proportion to one's courage." - Ana´s Nin
by Crazy Horse on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 09:05:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I suppose the
radioactive substances from temporarily melted fuel rods at the Number 2 reactor had made their way into water in the containment
is meant to indicate that the fuel rods did melt at some point, releaseing radioactive substances, but have since cooled down so no more radionuclides are being added to the water.

The real problem here is that radioactive water outside the reactor indicates both 1) a meltdown; 2) a failure of "wet containment" (the "torus" in a Mark I design).

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 09:15:46 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Yeah, but by then they hardly qualify as "fuel rods" any more.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 09:44:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Ok so reactors more complex than BWR's have their control rods held up by electromagnets, so if power fails, the rods fall into the rod assemblys and reaction is shut down, With BWR's they are forced up from the bottom. So say your fuel melts in a PWR reactor, then as the fuel melts into a puddle your control rods collapse into the mix as they are unsupported.and so continue to a degree to moderate the reaction. You would assume that the control rods in a BWR have to be held fairly rigidly to enable fuel loading, its not like you can go in and shake the control rods so that you can fit the gaps in the fuel assembly if one isnt ligned up properly.

If it works then like I think, then the more the fuel has melted, then the less moderation will occur, its like the control rods have been pulled back out of the reactor, and all of the  fuel rods have been pressed together.

If so I just don't see how this situation can ever be brought back under control.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 10:54:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think the control rods melt along with the fuel rods.

What are the control rods made of?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 11:03:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Boron Carbide apparently, Melts at 2763 °C

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 11:06:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hmm, Zirconium melts at 1855C...

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 11:10:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Thats what I was thinking

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon Mar 28th, 2011 at 11:11:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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