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Kyodo - Edano suggests scrapping all reactors at Fukushima Daiichi plant  

Top government spokesman Yukio Edano suggested Wednesday that all of the reactors at the troubled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant should be scrapped.

Asked if all six reactors must be decommissioned, Edano said in a news conference, ''I believe it is very clear from the viewpoint of society. That is my perception.''

His remarks came after Tsunehisa Katsumata, chairman of plant operator Tokyo Electric Power Co., told a separate news conference, ''We have no choice but to scrap reactors 1 to 4 if we look at their conditions objectively.''

Following the devastating March 11 earthquake and ensuing tsunami that hit northeastern and eastern Japan, four of the six reactors at the nuclear power plant northeast of Tokyo have lost their cooling functions and leaked radioactive materials into the air and sea.

The No. 5 and 6 reactors, which have been relatively less problematic than the other four, are already in a state of cold shutdown.  



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 07:03:35 AM EST
So all this time - after three hydrogen explosions, an indeterminate number of meltdowns, and dousing with salt water - they've been considering a restart?

How do you restart a reactor after a meltdown? Because if the core is radioactive slag, fuel and control rod management must be - interesting.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 07:24:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
i think its more theyre scrapping 5 and 6 as well as the others

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 07:29:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
although the BBC is only saying 4

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 08:15:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
BBC:

Locals would be consulted on reactors 5 and 6, which were shut down safely.

What locals? They're all at least 30km away.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 08:39:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe they're referring to the emergency workers at Fukushima, most of whom are locals.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 08:41:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
See also:

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 08:58:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
asahi.com(朝日新聞社):Stricken nuclear plant faces staffing difficulties - English

The prolonged crisis at the quake-stricken nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture is increasingly wearing down front-line workers, as the exhausting and dangerous work shows no signs of letting up.

Companies supplying the workers say safety fears have grown, particularly since three workers were exposed to high levels of radiation last Thursday from leaked water at the No. 3 reactor of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Although some workers continue to return to the plant to avert a catastrophe, others willing to help cool down the reactors acknowledge they are more concerned about their next paycheck.

"We have become very nervous," said a senior official of a company with business ties to Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), operator of the plant.

The official said the company is checking to ensure that TEPCO was not forcing workers to engage in too difficult a task.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 09:19:06 AM EST
[ Parent ]
ceebs:
Companies supplying the workers say
So, the emergency workers are contractors?

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 09:23:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I keep seeing hints that a lot of this work is subcontracted, also hints that quite a few workers were allowed home after the initial quake, and they along with backup crews are missing after the Tsunami, so people in there working have been bought in from other plants. but nothing solid.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 09:41:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Stricken nuclear plant faces staffing difficulties  Asahi Shimbun

The prolonged crisis at the quake-stricken nuclear power plant in Fukushima Prefecture is increasingly wearing down front-line workers, as the exhausting and dangerous work shows no signs of letting up.

Companies supplying the workers say safety fears have grown, particularly since three workers were exposed to high levels of radiation last Thursday from leaked water at the No. 3 reactor of the Fukushima No. 1 nuclear power plant.

Although some workers continue to return to the plant to avert a catastrophe, others willing to help cool down the reactors acknowledge they are more concerned about their next paycheck.

"We have become very nervous," said a senior official of a company with business ties to Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO), operator of the plant.


An extended, if rambling, discussion follows.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 12:31:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan govt slams TEPCO for 'unacceptable' data error | India Reloaded.TV

The operator, Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO), was criticised by Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edono for describing the radiation levels as 10 million times higher than normal in water leaking from the No.2 reactor's turbine building, before correcting the figure to 100,000 times.

"Considering the fact that the monitoring of radioactivity is a major condition to ensure safety, this kind of mistake is absolutely unacceptable," Edano said, more than two weeks after the monster magnitude-9 quake and tsunami struck Japan's northeast leaving nearly 30,000 people dead or unaccounted for.

...

So far, 19 workers have been exposed to radiation exceeding 100 millisieverts at the plant, TEPCO said.

(my emphasis)

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 12:40:55 PM EST
[ Parent ]
TEPCO officials are thinking through the prism of their balance sheet and potential corporate survivability. To accept that even units 1-4 are lost except for liability is hard for them to get their minds around. They are not samurai and would not find seppuku an acceptable out.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 01:00:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Their balance sheet is bust and we have foreseen it would be from the first week of the disaster.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 02:55:38 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Tokyo Electric's Damaged Reactors May Take 30 Years, $12 Billion to Scrap - Bloomberg

Damaged reactors at the crippled Fukushima Dai-Ichi nuclear plant may take three decades to decommission and cost operator Tokyo Electric Power Co. more than 1 trillion yen ($12 billion), engineers and analysts said.

Four of the plant's six reactors became useless when sea water was used to cool them after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami knocked out generators running its cooling systems. The reactors need to be decommissioned, Tepco Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata said today. He couldn't give a timeframe.

All the reactors, including Units 5 and 6, will be shut down, and the government hasn't ruled out sealing the plant in concrete, Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano told reporters today in Tokyo.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 11:08:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
12 billion dollars in cleanup costs? Good thing the Japanese government had recently doubled the operators' maximum liability to 1.2 billion. Oh, wait!

dvx:

Plant operator liability is exclusive and absolute, and power plant operators must provide a 'financial security amount' of ¥60 billion ($600 million). From 2010, this doubles to ¥120 billion ($1.2 billion). Beyond that, the government provides coverage, and liability is unlimited. The revision to the law also increases penalties, including fines, for nuclear companies operating plants without financial security, from the current maximum of ¥500,000 ($5040) up to ¥1 million ($10,090).
Oh, and, on the 30-year time span: Windscale fire - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
The reactor was unsalvageable; where possible, the fuel rods were removed, and the reactor bioshield was sealed and left intact. Approximately 6,700 fire-damaged fuel elements and 1,700 fire-damaged isotope canisters remain in the pile. The damaged reactor core was still slightly warm as a result of continuing nuclear reactions.[11] Windscale Pile 2, though undamaged by the fire, was considered too unsafe for continued use. It was shut down shortly afterward. No air-cooled reactors have been built since. The final removal of fuel from the damaged reactor was scheduled to begin in 2008 and continue for a further four years.
That's over 50 years after the accident.

So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 11:14:34 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Windscale, Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, Units 1-4 at Fukushima, That is seven nuclear disasters -- and counting. How many more?

The financing of new reactors should be required to take into account the cost of cleanup by paying into a fund to provide that cleanup with the cost being based on the historical failure rate with some, but not more than 50% downward modification for presumed design improvements. Those responsible for the solvency of that fund should have a voice in the setting or safety regulations.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 12:40:30 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You're missing
one [INES level 6] incident to date:
  • Kyshtym disaster at Mayak, Soviet Union, 29 September 1957. A failed cooling system at a military nuclear waste reprocessing facility caused a steam explosion that released 70-80 tons of highly radioactive material into the environment. Impact on local population is not fully known. This is the only accident to go over 5 on scale besides Chernobyl.
and a number of INES level 5 incidents


So, in what may be my last act of "advising", I'll advise you to cut the jargon. -- My old PhD advisor, to me, 26/2/11
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 12:46:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, I did have three of these listed. Quibble, quibble.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 12:53:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
And two more were military accidents, two more (Chalk River, Lucens) were research reactors, one more a radioactive material in wrong hands incident. Only the ones you name were commercial reactors in need of such insurance you wrote about.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 01:05:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Windscale had a graphite core, which always complicates cleanup. A better comparison is TMI, where decontamination started after 5 years and was completed 7 years after that.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 01:13:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The cleanup cost was $1 billion.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Wed Mar 30th, 2011 at 01:14:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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