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The data in question is available here. In the latest reports however, radioactivity in the drywell and wetwell of No. 2 sank (from 40.5 to 39.6 Sv/h resp. from 1.35 to 1.26 Sv/h).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 05:12:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I made the following diagram out of all the reactor interior radiation levels given (DW = drywell, WW = wet well or suppression chamber):

It would appear that No. 1 should be much ore of a concern continued meltdown-wise. Checking other parameters for the last big uptick in drywell radioactivity, core and drywell pressures and temperature also went up, so this wasn't simply due to venting.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:05:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Wait - what? Those are full Sv/hr?
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:30:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
yep. dry well and wet well readings

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:34:35 PM EST
[ Parent ]
[speechless]
by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:45:16 PM EST
[ Parent ]
{more than usual} ?

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 06:52:12 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I could see problems with striping of paint and destruction of electronics at those levels. Do we have reference levels for what "normal operation" levels were.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 08:20:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Well I can't see any anywhere, but You would think that normally they would need to be low enough for people to work round them, charging the reactor, swapping out fuel etc. and with radiation at that level, you wouldnt really want a pool of spent fuel around either, unless that is a level under the bowels of the machine where people dont go.  (although we do know theres at least one cable run underneath, and  the bit where we had people step in puddles so there has to be some form of access down below)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 08:36:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Do people work inside the containment, except for maintenance? Also worth to note: the drywell is not normally filled with water.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 01:34:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
How does the radiation make the paint stripe?
by njh on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 06:54:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
This was reported from Chernobyl. My surmise is that at sufficiently high radiation levels the chemical structure of the paint is attacked and it is basically burnt or evaporated off the surface. Each element responds differently to various types of radiation. Some may vaporize, some may heat up to the point that the chemical bonds are broken and/or oxidized or reduced.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 10:27:43 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I had a friend who used to supply specialised paints to the nuke industry. I remember him saying that if you look old paint on a house it bubbles and cracks, in a normal working nuke plant, the paint on surfaces decays at five times the rate, depending on the  exposure. However everything is painted to keep moisture away from metal surfaces, as rust absorbs radiation more than plain steel, and is much harder to decontaminate. At vastly increased radioactive rates you'll get much more cracking and bubbling as impurities occur and you get  breakdown of some molecules in the paint matrix.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 06:47:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
wow!
by njh on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 05:09:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
How does fire make the paint stripe?

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Apr 2nd, 2011 at 05:23:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I found some pressure/temperature data and graphs for reactors 1,2,3 here.
by das monde on Thu Mar 31st, 2011 at 09:56:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Update:

In the dry well of No. 1, the radiation level went further up. However, drywell pressure dropped (from 0.230 to 0.210 MPa). As for the pressure vessel, temperatures dropped, while the two pressure sensors give different data, and the lower data dropped further while the higher one rose (I guess the second device is malfunctioning).

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Apr 1st, 2011 at 04:42:01 AM EST
[ Parent ]
40 Sv per hour? Jesus fucking christ. That's roughly what standing next to the exploded reactor in Chernobbyl gave you. In other news, I hade a nightmare last night of being exposed to half a Sievert. No radiation poisoning detected in the dream at least.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 08:59:36 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Dream on!

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sun Apr 3rd, 2011 at 11:18:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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