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It's the end result of the restructuring that is a question. If this is liberalisation as we know it, then they want the 'good' parts of TEPCO to be re-constituted as newly established smaller companies or subsidiaries of existing majors after a bankruptcy selloff, and the new companies/subsidiaries would then be in wonderful efficiency-bosting la-la-land competition. After the government shouldered the costs of managing the 'bad' parts of the company and caspitalising the 'good' parts, of course.

A serious reform policy would involve a takeover but not necessarily a bankruptcy/dismemberment. It would also be more wide-reaching than just covering TEPCO: it is clear that nuclear safety and labour oversight over TEPCO failed, so the government agencies themselves need reform, and then all the other regional monopolists beyond TEPCO (and nuclear research institutes) have to be thoroughly checked, too. (This won't happen of course.)

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Mon Apr 18th, 2011 at 05:16:25 AM EST
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DoDo:
(This won't happen of course.)

unless maybe you're underestimating fukushima's capacity to continue spewing isotopes. can we seriously believe their claim to have it all sorted in 6-9 months?

the truly terrifying aspect to this is we may need fukushima to keep releasing to drive home the point that nuclear power is an humanly untenable proposition.

if the species is stubbornly self-destructive enough, what else would cause our elders and betters to reconsider? nothing coming up for me...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Apr 18th, 2011 at 07:31:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the question is already answered once and for all.  

But the damage is never measured correctly.  

The image is stuffing corpses under the floorboards and then denying there is any problem or anything to see.  

Your question is like asking when they will run out of unused (under) floor space.  But then, won't they just move on to the walls and ceiling?  It's a big house . . .

The Fates are kind.

by Gaianne on Mon Apr 18th, 2011 at 01:16:11 PM EST
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well this may be what finally gets it through our thick crania how small the house is in reality.

can't deny something damn stinky's going on for ever.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Mon Apr 18th, 2011 at 02:18:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
For others, "The house has always smelled like this."  

The Fates are kind.
by Gaianne on Mon Apr 18th, 2011 at 11:16:51 PM EST
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so the government agencies themselves need reform, and then all the other regional monopolists beyond TEPCO (and nuclear research institutes) have to be thoroughly checked, too. (This won't happen of course.)

There is actually discussion of the need for some of those measures in the article. That, by itself, is significant in Japan, I beieve, and the point of my comment was not that reforms will succeed but that they are being proposed by elements within the government and that these proposals would be serious reforms if enacted in whole or in part. I suspect that the LDP and rival factions within Kan's own party will use/are using the protective reaction to attempt to topple Kan and spike the reform effort. They may succeed and then we get to see how long that government lasts. I suspect that those pushing this effort are conflicted just now. They don't want to have to assume responsibility just now but don't want to see their patronage base damaged or destroyed.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Mon Apr 18th, 2011 at 10:47:16 AM EST
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