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(This comment on Chernobyl), to avoid blowing the margin wide:

See the subthread in the Salon Tuesday, and this map:

The exclusion zone is 30 km around Chernobyl, which practically corresponds to what Proskura is saying in your citation. (√(2600/3.14) = 29). But the map shows that there are uncontaminated (green) areas within the exclusion zone, and that heavily contaminated areas continue beyond it. The Belarus border can be seen top left, and the contamination levels are displayed across it. So it would be interesting to have the complete map this Ukraine section was taken from.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Apr 22nd, 2011 at 02:01:42 PM EST
Wish people could pick one standard unit for maps and stick to them so we can compare japanese and russian maps :)

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Fri Apr 22nd, 2011 at 07:28:13 PM EST
[ Parent ]


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 03:02:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Source?
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 05:43:45 AM EST
[ Parent ]
It was in a directory of images on the site it is hotlinked from. However, it appears to be one status between multiple revisions of the border, because the Chernobyl Tour site's map of the Ukrainian side Chernobyl Exclusion Zone (here) is somewhat more extensive to the southwest, while the maps here and National Geographic's 2006 map cut off just that part.

Wikipedia also has this (without source):

Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Exclusion Zone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The most contaminated zone had a radius of 30 km (19 mi) from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The border of the zone was later adjusted to better parallel the locations of highest contamination.


*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 06:41:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Actually, the NatGeo map matches the one I posted. So the Chernobyl Stalker maps (with further reduction to the southeast) are probably the newest state.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 06:45:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I'd say the outsideonline.com map you posted was based on The Nat Geo one, with a mistake in the scale.

Otherwise, there are different contours in each map. In particular, some include Belarus territory in the exclusion zone, others stop at the border. The Wikipedia map suggests there are different levels of control within the overall exclusion zone.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 08:22:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The scale is surely kilometres, not miles. There are 30 "units" from centre to periphery (ie 3 x the bar that is labelled "10 miles").
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 06:11:51 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Exclusion Zone - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant Exclusion Zone, which is sometimes referred to as The Chernobyl Zone, The 30 Kilometer Zone, The Zone of Alienation, or simply The Zone (Ukrainian official designation: Зона відчуження Чорнобильської АЕС, zona vidchuzhennya Chornobyl's'koyi AES, colloquially: Чорнобильська зона, Chornobyl's'ka zona оr Четверта зона, Chetverta zona) is the 30 km/19 mi exclusion zone around the site of the Chernobyl nuclear reactor disaster and is administered by a special administration under the Ukrainian Ministry of Extraordinary Situations (Emergencies).

...

The Exclusion Zone was established soon after the Chernobyl disaster in 1986, in order to evacuate the local population and to prevent people from entering the heavily contaminated territory. The area adjoining the site of the disaster was originally divided into 4 concentric zones. The most contaminated zone had a radius of 30 km (19 mi) from the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant. The border of the zone was later adjusted to better parallel the locations of highest contamination.

According to the map, the "adjustment" must have been considerable...

And how it's administered in Belarus and Russia is not covered.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 06:02:22 AM EST
[ Parent ]
http://www.slideshare.net/energy/radiation-monitoring-data-from-fukushima-area-04182011?from=ss_embe d

page 3 on here  is the aerial survey map of Fukushima, unfortunately in Different units.

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.

by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sat Apr 23rd, 2011 at 06:55:06 PM EST
[ Parent ]


Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 24th, 2011 at 01:30:49 PM EST
[ Parent ]
need to blow that up larger

Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Sun Apr 24th, 2011 at 01:31:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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