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by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon May 2nd, 2011 at 11:38:03 AM EST
BBC News - Scots windfarms paid cash to stop producing energy

Six Scottish windfarms were paid up to £300,000 to stop producing energy, it has emerged.

The turbines, at a range of sites across Scotland, were stopped because the grid network could not absorb all the energy they generated.

Details of the payments emerged following research by the Renewable Energy Foundation (REF).

The REF said energy companies were paid £900,000 to halt the turbines for several hours between 5 and 6 April.



Any idiot can face a crisis - it's day to day living that wears you out.
by ceebs (ceebs (at) eurotrib (dot) com) on Mon May 2nd, 2011 at 03:16:47 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Renewable Energy Foundation - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

There have been critics of REF's agenda in particular Juliet Davenport, chief executive of green energy provider Good Energy and Dale Vince founder of Ecotricity, who both accuse the organisation of using a deliberately "misleading" name, Vince says "They are not a Foundation for Renewable Energy, as their name says and as any reasonable person would conclude from their name - they actually exist to undermine Renewable Energy - in that respect their name is a deceit,".

Other Critics such as Maria McCaffery, chief executive of RenewableUK, a trade body which represents more than 600 wind and marine energy firms, says the Renewable Energy Foundation's true purpose is diametrically opposed to the interests of the wind energy industry. "It is an anti-wind lobbying organisation," she told BusinessGreen. "I'd like to know where the renewable energy part of their remit is. They don't foster or promote or develop, they just try to undermine the case for wind energy all the time."[6]

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon May 2nd, 2011 at 03:29:33 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Who are the Renewable Energy Foundation? - 16 Feb 2011 - Feature from BusinessGreen
You might expect an organisation known as the Renewable Energy Foundation to be consistently in favour of renewable energy projects. But according to its many critics, nothing could be further from the truth for an organisation that stands accused of misleading the public by consistently campaigning against wind farms.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon May 2nd, 2011 at 03:30:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Also sponsors of reports much quoted by the anti-DFH pro-nuke noobs on The Register - who are either wilfully ignorant or don't seem to understand how industrial PR and lobbying work.

Did you know there have been days when there was no wind at all in the whole of Northern Europe? Therefore windmills = fail.

It must be true. I read it online somewhere.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 04:34:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
that's what grid managers do - they bring plants online and shut them down at various times.

At all times, you have peaking plants on standby, ready to be brought on line or, if they are producing, to be shut off. A lot of the time, they are paid to be idle and nobody complains about it. That's how it is meant to work.

Sigh.

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 05:46:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Hundreds of Miles of Wind Farms, Networked Under the Sea | Popular Science

During the last ice age, glaciers a mile high pushed several dozen cubic miles of rock, sand and debris into the ocean off North America's mid-Atlantic coast, creating a broad shelf that extends up to 40 miles offshore. This long, flat stretch of seabed and the shallow, windy waters that cover it make the ideal spot for dozens of offshore wind farms--and if all goes well, the network that would link those turbines together and back to the coast will soon be in place.

Offshore wind power has significant advantages over the onshore variety. Uninterrupted by changes in terrain, the wind at sea blows steadier and stronger. Installing turbines far enough from shore that they're invisible except on the very clearest days lessens the possibility of not-in-my-backyard resistance. The challenge is getting the electricity back to land, to the people who will use it.

The Maryland-based transmission-line company Trans-Elect proposes to do just that with a $5-billion undersea power grid that would stretch some 350 miles from northern New Jersey to southern Virginia. The Atlantic Wind Connection (AWC) would provide multiple transmission hubs for future wind farms, making the waters off the mid-Atlantic coast an attractive and economical place for developers to set up turbines. The AWC's lines could transmit as much as six gigawatts of low-carbon power from turbines back to the coast--the equivalent capacity of 10 average coal-fired power plants.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon May 2nd, 2011 at 03:26:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Japan plans new tsunami wall at nuclear plant
Tokyo (AFP) May 2, 2011
The operator of Japan's Fukushima nuclear plant will build a wall to defend it against future tsunamis, reports said Monday, as public confidence slipped in the government's handling of the disaster.

Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) also plans to triple from about 1,000 to 3,000 the number of staff nuclear workers and subcontractors handling the crisis to reduce each individual's radiation exposure.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Mon May 2nd, 2011 at 03:32:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Damn, there's nothing like bolting the door after the horse has gone is there ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 07:20:33 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Independent - We all said disaster would strike here, not Fukushima

After a 40-year campaign, warnings about the vast nuclear power station on Japan's earthquake faultline are finally being heard.


keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 07:27:08 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Debt, Radiation and Earthquakes: It is Getting Worse and Everyone Knows It | Hawai`i News Daily

Our government is lying about the economy getting better. It is getting worse and everyone knows it. Japan is lying about the problems it is having with its nuclear plants. It's not over. It is getting worse and everyone knows it.

The fossil fuel companies successfully convinced the world that global warming doesn't exist. Or at least that it is not anthropogenic. For whatever reason, it DOES exist - and it's too late to do anything about it. As ice melts and the weight is released from the tectonic plates it has held in place for thousands of years, those plates are going to move. They ARE moving. Japan will see more MAG9.x earthquakes. So will the left coast of the US.

Every nuclear reactor in the world was built to withstand the greatest possible shock imaginable. Magnitude 6.9. Those are starting to happen regularly. A 6.9 occurred in the Solomon Islands on the 23rd. Magnitude 6.x earthquakes are suddenly very common. Just like Category 5 hurricanes are becoming very common. Weather extremes are becoming very common.

true or bs?

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 02:56:49 AM EST
[ Parent ]
melo:
As ice melts and the weight is released from the tectonic plates it has held in place for thousands of years, those plates are going to move. They ARE moving. Japan will see more MAG9.x earthquakes. So will the left coast of the US.

Not this again... Doom porn overture.

  1. Tectonic plates are moving with or without the effects of global warming. They don't care much. Japan won't be seeing more magnitude 9.0 earthquakes because of it but will always be at more risk because of the fact the islands are perched above the crash site of three tectonic plates. The connection to the left coast of the USA is sheer delusional and unfounded - there is no more ice to melt.

  2. Earthquakes with magnitude 6 are only a lot more common since our equipment for measuring earthquakes got better spread around the planet. That happened a few decades ago. There is no visible trend for the last ten year of more <6.0 earthquakes - and there is no scientific foundation for claiming something else.

  3. Weather extremes have not been shown to become more common. Category 5 hurricanes are not becoming more common either, and cat 5 hurricanes don't tell us much interesting. And there is no signal in the hurricane record for increasing cyclone energy either.

I'm going to stop reading here, and won't believe anything else. Who writes this stuff?
by Nomad (Bjinse) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 04:03:47 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Look, Everyone Knows It, 'cept grumpy old you.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 05:09:20 AM EST
[ Parent ]
thank gaia for nomad!

whew, it sounded so logical

;)

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 10:21:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
FT.com / Reports - Climate change: Food and water supplies show strain

As European governments debate the costs and benefits of better or different flood defences, some of their counterparts in north Africa and elsewhere have been besieged or toppled at least in part as a result of the soaring cost of food.

The two are linked by the role that the climate, and particularly the threat of a changing climate, has played. Some of the key questions for governments and companies include how climate change could affect them and what they can do to prepare for it.

This goes further than being just about the impact of too much rain at the wrong time, or not enough when it is needed.

Elizabeth Stephens, a political and security risks expert at Jardine Lloyd Thomson, the insurance broker, says commodity and especially food prices will continue to be a huge problem in the coming years. They fed directly into the recent unrest in Tunisia and elsewhere, for example, but they are far from the only climate-related risk.

"The other thing about to hit is water shortages," she says. "Yemen is about to run out of water."

by Nomad (Bjinse) on Tue May 3rd, 2011 at 03:39:43 AM EST
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