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that more than a few of the French elites have now joined the corporate gravy train (leaving the administration/policial side of the world) and weakening France's political ambitions from the inside.

Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 05:09:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The Reagan/Thatcher revolution, the "pensée unique" and later the social-democrat "third way" have coincided with an erosion of the ethic of public service. The cultural effect of the last 30 years may be more lasting and damaging than the economic effect.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 05:27:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Migeru:
an erosion of the ethic of public service.

and a corresponding diminution of public trust in their government spokesmen.

The cultural effect of the last 30 years may be more lasting and damaging than the economic effect.

it's quicker to whip up a bubble than educate a child... the yawning gap between rich and poor, 3 generations of entitlement, and the paucity of employment opportunity leads to intense cynicism amongst the youth, and a rejection of even the most basic of social pacts. a cocktail of reasons for dissent, but the PTB, in their flawless wisdoom, have decided that a please state is one where renewables are ignored, suppressed, defamed and otherwise hobbled, when a switch would guarantee umpteen responsible jobs for the unemployed and reduce social tensions no end*, in favour of coal/gas/nuke top down oligarchy where no-one in their right mind would want to work, just to keep those freaking utility bills coming in.

*and just for kicks possibly save our species from mass extinction.

yes, we have no bananas.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 05:57:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]

   Indeed.  To say the least.  The idea that France's power élite are, were, or wanted to be some sort of counterweight to a supposed German-led penchant "to dominate the EU through increased corporate dominance" strikes me as strange and fanciful.  Certainly not "the world we live in."

"In such an environment it is not surprising that the ills of technology should seem curable only through the application of more technology..." John W Aldridge
by proximity1 on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 07:18:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
  Not sure there's really in fact what appears to be some incongruency, implied or expressed, there.

   For true-believers in the neo-lib faith, there's no such thing as a distinction between "inside" and "outside" (the nation)  or "public" and "private" administration.  All administration, properly seen, is to be (or become, eventually) privately held whether in appearance or not.

    So, while political ambitions there are, they aren't "french" or any other nationality; they're "purer" than that.  This test of strength is at least in part a struggle over the question of who "owns" and directs the "Euro" as a currency and the monetary policies which are attached to it--- shall it "Europe", its member states, or, as corporate interests would have it, banks and their clientele interests?

    It's almost not even a question at all since there doesn't seem to be much force on the side of "Europe" except that which is to be seen in the streets and public squares of Spain, Greece, etc.--though, of course, that may change and in fact, I think one way or another, it must.  People have a strong aversion to starving to death.

"In such an environment it is not surprising that the ills of technology should seem curable only through the application of more technology..." John W Aldridge

by proximity1 on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 07:48:43 AM EST
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