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European Tribune - Merkel's nuclear exit

I think further: incidentally, 2021 is an election year - so a right-wing government returning in 2017 or 2021 after a defeat in 2013 would have the opportunity to execute another phaseout of the phaseout once Fukushima recedes from public memory.

The 1980 swedish referendum on nuclear power ended with a majority for gradual nuclear exit and a minority for immidiate nuclear exit. The ýear 2010 was generally understood as the final year for the gradual exit. Well, that did not happen.

So I think the plan is to take offline the most dangerous plants and then wait until the mood changes.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Mon May 30th, 2011 at 04:23:23 PM EST
There is 8000 MW of nuclear capacity in the north-German nuclear cluster (Brokdorf, Brunsbüttel, Emsland, Grohnde, Unterweser and Krümmel). There is a great deamnd for greater interconnection between the continent and the hydropower of Scandinavia to make possible greater utilization of wind power down south. The southernmost of these plants (Grohnde) is located about 750 km from the Swedish nuclear power plant Oskarshamn. The distance between the big hydro plants of northern Sweden and Stockholm is a somewhat longer than 750 km. Building five new reactors with a total output of 8000 MW in Oskarshamn would cost roughly 25 billion euros. The Swedish national debt is about 30 % of GDP. The cumulative budget surplus during the next three years is supposed to be somewhere around 35 billion euros.

Just sayin'...

Oh, and the distance to the French border is about half of this.


Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.

by Starvid on Mon May 30th, 2011 at 04:45:37 PM EST
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Is 25 billion the cost of the full life-cycle, or "just" construction? I am thinking decommission costs. That cost for GW is not that much...
by cagatacos on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 01:26:33 AM EST
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25 billion euros is only construction costs (counted as baseline costs plus 50% cost overrun), which however dominate the nuclear cost mass. In Sweden decomissioning is financed by a tax on nuclear energy, 0.1-0.2 eurocents per kWh, which are put in a segregated fund which finances decomissioning in its entirety: scrapping the plants, storing the fuel until the deep repository is completed, building the deep repository, and developing the technology needed for all this.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Tue May 31st, 2011 at 08:22:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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