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Speaking as an outsider ...

In a way it's a herring of redness.  In another ... it goes to the heart of the matter. Lizzy may, or may not, directly own/control the land but she is the Poster Posh example of a deep-dog serious Scottish problem:  absentee landlordism locking locals out.  It's been 35 years since I talked/studied with the Single Taxers but, as I recall, Scotland was The Horrible Example of land use law and policies gone wrong.  

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri May 6th, 2011 at 03:15:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
If I understand this correctly, this is a legacy of Union with England in the 18th century. The Scottish nobility got a green light to ship their population to the New World at an ever increasing pace and they could move to London.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri May 6th, 2011 at 04:11:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
As I recall it was more a matter of kicking the crofters out and replacing them with sheep so the nobility could move to London.

Immigration to various Imperial lands was an "externality."

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre

by ATinNM on Fri May 6th, 2011 at 04:29:44 PM EST
[ Parent ]
They were a bothersome nuisance and the nobility had wanted them out of the way so they could run sheep more efficiently. This had been an ongoing problem, "enclosure" since the late middle ages. Thomas More described "sheep that eat men" in Utopia. In the 18th century the Scottish nobility hired ships to transport the crofters to the New World. Only some of the 'Scotts-Irish' came from Northern Ireland.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Fri May 6th, 2011 at 06:03:55 PM EST
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