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One of the things the Logical Positivists got right was their insistence "emotive language" is Un-Useful.

She believed in nothing; only her skepticism kept her from being an atheist. -- Jean-Paul Sartre
by ATinNM on Wed Sep 7th, 2011 at 03:20:28 PM EST
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As opposed to the other kind of language?
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Wed Sep 7th, 2011 at 03:24:50 PM EST
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I think emotive language can be quite useful (admitting that I am uncertain of the exact definition Logical Positivsts used), but one needs to know what emotions one wakes. As I see Godwin's law, in general any reference to nazis gives "evilness on the scale of the Holocaust" as the main connection. And as I have quipped not even the 1930ies nazis lived up to that. Most people not agreeing that X = evilness on the scale of the Holocaust will react badly to your implication that it is, even if you were just trying to say that X = aspect of nazi policy.

As an example, the Swedish Pirate Party has mostly used references to former DDR when doing examples of oppressive surveilliance. That I think is wise as former DDR is in Sweden mainly known for its oppressive surveilliance while for example Nazi Germany and the Soviet Union, though examples of oppressive surveilliance, are more known for other things, like mass murders and wars.

So back to the topic here, it might have been more useful to use Merkel expects other countries to fall in line, to form lines as straight as in the 1st of May parades of her youth in DDR if one wants to evoke a picture of oppressive commands from Germany. It is not very catchy (I had to come up with an example right now) and I have no idea of what Merkel did under communism, but it is still more precise and uas a more well known image then Gleichschaltung.

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by A swedish kind of death on Wed Sep 7th, 2011 at 03:50:06 PM EST
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