Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
This is in Deutsche Welle, German and Spanish edition. I can't find it in English.

Als Griechenland deutsche Schulden halbierte (23.09.2011)

London 1953: Deutschland verhandelt mit 22 Staaten. Die deutsche Delegation bittet ihre Partner um einen Schuldenerlass. Zu sehr drücken die hohen Verbindlichkeiten aus dem Marshall-Plan und den Reparationen, die noch für den Ersten Weltkrieg zu bezahlen sind.

Die Bitte der Deutschen wird erhört. Die 22 Staaten, unter ihnen Griechenland, erlassen den Deutschen die Hälfte der Schulden. Der Zweite Weltkrieg war erst wenige Jahre zuvor 1945 zu Ende gegangen und für die junge Bundesrepublik Deutschland war der Schuldenschnitt eine große Hilfe, sagt Jürgen Kaiser, Koordinator der Entschuldungsinitiative 'erlassjahr.de': "Deutschland hatte danach eine Schuldendienstquote, die deutlich unter dem lag, was heute Entwicklungsländer oder auch Griechenland bezahlen müssen."

...

Seit langem setzt sich die Initiative 'erlassjahr.de', eine Koalition aus mehreren christlichen und entwicklungspolitischen Gruppen, für Insolvenzverfahren ein. Das Londoner Abkommen aus dem Jahr 1953 könnte Vorbild sein, wie man mit überschuldeten Staaten umgeht, findet Jürgen Kaiser von 'erlassjahr.de': "Genau wie während der Schuldenkrise der 1980er und 1990er Jahre viele Dritte-Welt-Länder mit einer solchen Regelung besser gefahren wären als mit den sehr langsamen, häufig wirkungslosen Entschuldungsmechanismen von Weltbank und Internationalem Währungsfonds, genauso könnte das Abkommen heute ein Vorbild für die Situation von Griechenland sein."

De cómo los griegos perdonaron a los alemanes su deuda (24.09.2011)
Londres, 1953: Alemania negocia con 22 países. La delegación germana ruega a sus socios la condonación de su deuda. Además de las obligaciones contraídas por las ayudas del Plan Marshall, tenía préstamos para pagar reparaciones que aún debía de la Primera Guerra Mundial.

La petición es escuchada. Los 22 países -Grecia entre ellos- perdonan a los alemanes la mitad de lo que deben. "Para la joven Alemania, aquel gesto supuso una ayuda enorme", dice Jürgen Kaiser, coordinador de la iniciativa Año para la Condonación de Deuda (Erlassjahr.de): "El interés de su deuda de aquel entonces es comparable con el que hoy tienen que pagar países en desarrollo e incluso la propia Grecia."

...

Desde hace tiempo, la iniciativa Erlassjahr.de trata de que se implemente un protocolo de insolvencia. "El Acuerdo de Londres de 1953 podría servir como ejemplo sobre cómo actuar con países con sobreendeudamiento como Grecia", opina Jürgen Kaiser, de Erlassjahr.de. "Durante la crisis de deuda de los años 80 y 90, a muchos países del Tercer Mundo les hubiera ido mejor con un cierto protocolo de actuación, en lugar de con los ineficaces mecanismos del Banco Mundial y del FMI."

When Greece halved Germany's debts
London, 1953: Germany negotiates with 22 countries. The German delegation begs its partners to forgive its debts. In addition to the obligations contracted though Marchall Plan aid, it had loans to pay from WWI war reparations.

The request is heard. The 22 countries, Greece among them, forgive the Germans half of what they owe. "For the young Germany, that gesture was an immense help" says Juergen Kaiser, coordinator of the initiative Year for debt forgiveness (Erlassjahr.de): "The interest on the debt back then is comparable to what developing countries or Greece must pay today."

...

For some time, the Enlassjahr.de initiative is trying to get an insolvency protocol established. "The 1953 London agreement could serve as a model on how to act on overindebted countries such as Greece", says Juergen Kaiser of Erlassjahr.de. "During the debt crisis of the 1980s and 90s, many Third World countries would have been much better off with a given action protocol, rather than the ineffectual mechanisms of the World Bank and IMF."



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 25th, 2011 at 04:08:30 AM EST
Worth diarying and fornt paging?

Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Sun Sep 25th, 2011 at 07:05:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Maybe, along with Varoufakis' take on the Marshall Plan and the Euro.

Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 25th, 2011 at 09:04:28 AM EST
[ Parent ]
why isn't this front page on the national press of all euro nations?

how short the public's memory! how clueless the choice of institutional solutions till now...

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Sep 25th, 2011 at 07:36:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Oh, but it has been all over the place:

Comment is Free: Germany owes Greece a debt: Germany's ducking of the war reparations issue makes its attitude to the current Greek debt crisis somewhat hypocritical (Albrecht Ritschl, 21 June 2011)

What is truly strange, however, is the brevity of Germany's collective memory. For during much of the 20th century, the situation was radically different: after the first world war and again after the second world war, Germany was the world's largest debtor, and in both cases owed its economic recovery to large-scale debt relief.

...

Having footed the resulting massive bill, after the second world war the Americans imposed the London debt agreement of 1953 on their allies, an exercise in debt forgiveness to Germany on the most generous terms. West Germany's economic miracle, the stability of the deutschmark and the favourable state of its public finances were all owed to this massive haircut. But it put Germany's creditors at a disadvantage, leaving it to them to cope with the financial aftermath of the German occupation.

...

It may or may not have been wise to put the issue of reparations and other unsettled claims on Germany to rest after 1990. Back then, the Germans argued that any plausible bill would exceed the country's resources, and that continued financial co-operation in Europe instead would be infinitely more preferable. They may have had a point. But now is the time for Germany to deliver on the promise, act wisely and keep the bull away from the china shop.



Economics is politics by other means
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Sep 25th, 2011 at 09:10:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series