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*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:30:06 PM EST
EUobserver.com / Economic Affairs / Leaders break off EU budget talks

EU leaders on Friday (23 November) decided to break off the 2014-2020 budget negotiations and postpone them for another summit, as a second compromise attempt failed to reconcile positions between those wanting cuts and those asking for more money.

Admitting that there are "still existing divergences," EU council chief Herman Van Rompuy at a press conference said that leaders had given him the task to continue bilateral talks in the coming weeks, with a view to a final deal early next year.

EU commission chief Jose Manuel Barroso will also be involved in what he described as "complex, difficult, but constructive talks."



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:30:14 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Germany floats 'plan B' - a budget deal without Britain | EurActiv

EU sources have fleshed out reports circulating last week about a plan to sideline the United Kingdom from ongoing budget talks, as Cameron threatened to veto a deal on the EU budget.

...If confirmed today, the 'plan B' would work in two steps.

  • First, EU leaders, recognising the impossibility of finding an agreement at 27, would issue a statement at today's meeting saying budget talks will resume in January 2013, at another summit.
  • In the meantime, they would reach a political agreement on the bloc's long-term finances - without the UK - and confirm it at the January summit.

Although not an official decision, the political agreement would allow the EU to continue funding itself "as if the MFF had been agreed," the source said, referring to the bloc's long-term budget, the Multi-annual Financial Framework.

The idea, which emanated from Berlin, was approved by Paris although the French had reservations, according to the same source. Crucially, Sweden and the Netherlands, which were initially reluctant, would now be willing to come on board.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:30:32 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Cyprus becomes fourth EU country to ask for bailout | World news | The Guardian

After months of haggling over the details, Cyprus announced on Friday that it had struck a deal with the EU and IMF to bail out its once vibrant but increasingly flagging economy, making it the fourth EU state to apply for a rescue programme since the eruption of Europe's debt crisis.

Hours after a government spokesman announced the step, international creditors confirmed that headway had been made although they stopped short of confirming an agreement had been sealed.

The island's finance minister Vassos Shiarly earlier estimated the financial assistance could be up to €17.5bn - as much as its entire annual economic output - following the battering of Cypriot banks by their exposure to debt-crippled Greece. The final amount will depend on a forthcoming analysis of how much Nicosia will need to recapitalise its lenders.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:30:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
MEPs demand moving EU elections to May 2014 | EurActiv

MEPs urged EU political parties to propose candidates to succeed Commission President José Manuel Barroso, in a bid to give voters a bigger say over who becomes the top EU executive. They also voted to move the poll from June to May so that they have time to prepare for the presidential election in July 2014.

MEPs easily approved a resolution pushing for a more political campaign ahead of the European elections and moving the date to either 15-18 May or 22-25 May 2014. The vote was 316 in favour, with 90 voting against and 20 MEPs abstaining.

The change would allow MEPs to elect the new head of the European Commission before the summer break and hold the hearings for new commissioners in the autumn.

The next Commission is due to take office on 1 November 2014.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:30:52 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Butkevicius approved as Lithuanian premier - Europe - World - The Independent

Lithuania's parliament approved Algirdas Butkevicius as prime minister on Thursday, giving the Social Democrat leader 15 days to present a Cabinet and policy program for approval.

Lawmakers voted 90 to 40 with 4 abstentions to appoint Butkevicius, according to a live broadcast from the parliament in the capital, Vilnius. The 141-seat chamber, which convened this week after October elections, currently only has 139 members as ballots in two districts were declared invalid and will be repeated in March.

The premier-designate's Social Democrat party formed a coalition with the Labor Party, the Order & Justice party and the Lithuanian Polish Election Action. President Dalia Grybauskaite, who proposed Butkevicius for the post and must approve the new government's composition, opposes Labor's participation as it is suspected of fraud and voting violations.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:31:00 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brutal attack on Tottenham fans raises fears of rising right-wing and racist violence in Italy - Europe - World - The Independent

The brutal attack on Tottenham fans in Rome has stoked fears in Italy of rising right-wing and racist violence.

Italy's capital has been rattled by increasing militancy by the extreme right since October, often with racist overtones. Weekly demonstrations by the neo-fascist youth group Blocco Studentesco have often ended in clashes with police.

Local media initially blamed Thursday's attack on hard core Lazio fans.

But two AS Roma fans were among the 15 detained for alleged involvement in the mass attack on a downtown bar, suggesting a possibly different motivation.

Witnesses told local media masked men armed with knives and baseball bats shouted "Jews, Jews" as they laid siege to a pub where the Tottenham fans were drinking in a district popular with tourists in an old quarter of Rome.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:31:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
DoDo:
Witnesses told local media masked men armed with knives and baseball bats shouted "Jews, Jews" as they laid siege to a pub where the Tottenham fans were drinking

wha? are they confused or is there a real connection?

facepalm

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 03:45:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Tottenham has a fair proportion of North London Jewish supporters.

Tottenham Hotspur F.C. - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The club, as with many clubs in London, has a large Jewish following and this has led to much antisemitic provocation[40][41] against Tottenham supporters. Tottenham supporters, Jewish and non-Jewish, united against this and adopted the nickname "Yids", developing chants to support this. Many fans view adopting "Yid" as a badge of pride, helping defuse its power as an insult.[42] Today it is mainly used to distinguish Tottenham fans from other football supporters.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 04:11:59 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Political comeback for `French Karl Rove' - FRANCE - FRANCE 24
 

His career was supposed to be over, but the man who guided former French president Nicolas Sarkozy to victory in 2007 - and then to defeat in 2012 - may yet have the last laugh. Patrick Buisson, the close and very secretive advisor to Sarkozy, has not only climbed back aboard the opposition UMP party (Union for a Popular Movement), but may be charting the conservative party's future course.

The UMP is struggling with potentially destructive internal divisions after a close election for the party's presidency between former prime minister François Fillon and the party's secretary general Jean-François Copé. The Nov. 18 poll ended with a shock victory for Copé, followed by name-calling and allegations of vote rigging.

But as the factions loyal to Fillon and Copé were left reeling, one clear winner emerged from the contest. Besides casting ballots for the party's next leader, UMP members were also asked to choose between six motions, or manifestos they believe should guide the party over the next two years.

With 28% of all votes cast - or six percentage points ahead of the next closest motion - a text inspired by the stealthy 63-year-old strategist Buisson came out on top.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 03:31:22 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Surprise surprise! Buisson having worked, from a situation of high influence, on a strategy of droitisation or leading the UMP electorate further to the right/ shifting the Overton window, now the hard-right factions in the party turn out to do well in a party election.

Who Could Have Predicted?

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 04:27:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]
@MigeruBlogger
Migeru Shimbun is out! http://paper.li/MigeruBlogger/1351816577 ... ▸ Top stories today via @pdegrauwe


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Fri Nov 23rd, 2012 at 06:38:15 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Independent: David Cameron faces EU charge of hypocrisy over demand for cuts

In a protest letter to Mr Cameron, Malcolm Colling, President of the Association of Independent Officials in the Commission, urged him to "rise above petty polemics" and halt the attacks on EU staff. He said the 23,800 Commission officials were outnumbered by the 33,000 staff employed by Leeds City Council.

Leeds has less than a million inhabitants. The EU has half a billion.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 05:23:39 AM EST
[ Parent ]
MSN: European Union's bureaucrats strike to protest austerity
The bill for Brussels is not actually enormous. The entire cost of running the EU and all its development, aid, research and subsidy programs amounts to only 1 percent of the bloc's gross domestic product. In most member states, government spending takes up nearer 40-50 percent of GDP.

...

Administration is just 6 percent of the EU budget, and there is evidence the Commission has cut back. Officials say they began tightening their belts long before the crisis. A fraud and cronyism scandal in 1999, which forced all the EU's commissioners to resign, triggered a shake-up of how the institution and its administration is run.

...

The changes triggered a decline in the purchasing power of EU officials, according to figures provided by the Commission. Now it says it doesn't pay enough to attract as many qualified staff from richer western European countries as it needs. The Commission has proposed to peg its administrative costs to inflation for five years, and aims to cut staff by 1 percent a year, saying this will help save one billion euros by 2020.

Entry level wage cuts, increasingly fixed-term contracts rather than permanent employment, outsourcing of functions... the same logic of (mis)management is applied to firms, national governments, and the EU bureaucracy.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 06:04:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Sounds like good value for money.


-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 07:08:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Facts !! We don't need no stinkin' facts

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 10:46:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Just realised it should be "Facts ?? We don't need no stinking facts !!"

And that's a fact (pointless Rafa Benitez reference)

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 10:47:37 AM EST
[ Parent ]
We doan need no stinkin punkchewashun
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 04:13:48 PM EST
[ Parent ]

worst services, highest taxes, viva l'italia!

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 03:33:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Beppe Grillo's Blog
Italian companies are dying like flies while what's being discussed in Rome is how to save the parties and their beneficiaries, starting from the new electoral laws. A tailor-made, off the peg law for a Monti bis. A gentleman that is not putting himself forward as a candidate but who is already the new President of the Council by divine right in spite of democracy. Investing in Italy is no longer sensible, running a company is like a battle with a wind mill. Those running small and medium sized enterprises, the social fabric that holds this tottering country together, are the new Don Quixote that are fighting a battle that seems to be lost before the start. If they go down, the country will go down with them. When there's no longer any direct or indirect tax revenue coming from the small and medium enterprises, the machinery of Italy will stop and the problem will no longer be political or economic but social. How many "soldier blue"s will be needed to maintain public order? Then what will be the point of byzantine discussions about elections, the majority premiums, the little premiums, primaries done by Mr Nothings and sold like tubs of washing powder by media propaganda? Here Italy is going up in flames and the new Neros are playing the fiddle.
The company Price Waterhouse Coopers has published a classification of SMEs in different States based on three indices: the number of tax obligations, the time needed to calculate and manage taxes and the tax burden. Italy is at position 131 in the world. It's more worthwhile to start a company in Barbados (121), in Bielorussia (129), in Bosnia (128), in Cap Verde (102), in Colombia (99), even in Ethiopia (103) , Guatemala (124), Guyana (118), Iraq (65) , Moldova (109), Namibia (112), Nepal (114), Sierra Leone (117) and Uganda (93). An Italian SME has a tax burden of 68.3% and is subject to 15 taxes that involve 269 hours of work to sort out, which is about 33 working days. We are in the hands of madmen that have been released who state that they have revitalised the country by means of successes like the growth of the public debt, of unemployment, or inflation and of the collapse of production.


'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 03:38:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I am very surprised by those numbers.
France 65%??? I'd never read anything like that.

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi
by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 05:18:58 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Ah OK, it's for small and medium companies. So is it 68% of profits? Of what?

Earth provides enough to satisfy every man's need, but not every man's greed. Gandhi
by Cyrille (cyrillev domain yahoo.fr) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 05:20:38 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Probably includes payroll social contributions as a "tax wedge".

In any case, it's not company tax alone. And the former local "professional tax" has been replaced by a new one that, by and large, reduces the amount SMEs pay.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Sun Nov 25th, 2012 at 02:27:03 AM EST
[ Parent ]
@MigeruBlogger
Migeru Shimbun is out! http://paper.li/MigeruBlogger/1351816577 ... ▸ Top stories today via @infobancaetica @josecdiez


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sat Nov 24th, 2012 at 06:41:36 PM EST
[ Parent ]

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