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And the softer version would be the Seuro, which is, naturally, more mellifluous. It would, logically, mostly be used by countries south of the Rhine. But it would be harder to predict what the response would be to Greece creating only enough euros to pay government debts. Other than some neurotic fixations on absolute quantities of money by some Europeans what harm would that really do? Greece could just do what is has to do and no more and see what happens. The result is likely to be no worse than what will otherwise happen.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 01:42:04 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have no doubts France would make very sure to be on the neuro side.... (whatever it would be called in reality)

Aside from that, given the Rhine runs south-north, there is no such thing as its southern side.

by cris0 on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 03:55:42 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That would be a mistake for France.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 03:57:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
French citizens would disagree with you.

Like every other citizenry they appreciate not beeing robbed by their politicians via inflation.

by cris0 on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:21:15 PM EST
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???? via inflation??

What in the world do you think LTRO is through the ECB????????

by Upstate NY on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:25:41 PM EST
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That's not inflationary.

The 3-year LTRO is the ECB's way of telling the European banking system "winter is coming and it may last years". Basically the ECB is helping the banks to get into an all-cash position is they so wish, and keep it that way for 3 years with an option to get out of the position at any time after one year.

It has nothing to do with lending to the real economy and any inflationary effect is minuscule because any asset that could be turned into 3-year cash at the LTRO was also able to be turned into 1-week cash any week, at the same interest rate. So any asset that the LTRO turned into cash was cash already for all intents and purposes. That's what monetary policy through the discount window (American usage) or refinancing operations (European usage) does. It does not increase the monetary mass and therefore, for those who believe in such things as the quantity theory of money, it is not inflationary.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:32:55 PM EST
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Wouldn't you say, however, that this is the sort of thing the neoliberals opposed precisely because of their overweaning fears of inflation?
by Upstate NY on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:57:02 PM EST
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It's the sort of thing the neolibs should oppose if they believe their own theology.

Whether they actually oppose it or not is an excellent benchmark for whether they are deluded or deceptive. From casual perusal of the reactions, they seem roughly equally split between the two.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 06:00:00 PM EST
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Spiegel: Deutschlands heuchlerische Monetaristen.

Essentially, monetarists should not oppose the LTRO. Only Austrians should. There are a lot of "neoliberals" who are closet Austrians and who only appear to be Monetarist because, during the 1970s stagflation, both Austrians and Monetarists agreed on policy.

In the current crisis, by and large Keynesians and Monetarists should agree on policy against Austrians.

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 06:13:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
French citizens would disagree with you.

Improbable. No citizenry anywhere has ever preferred wage suppression and unemployment to inflation.

In fact, this is the precise reason the anti-democratic right had to come up with the garbage notion of "independent" central banks.

Like every other citizenry they appreciate not beeing robbed by their politicians via inflation.

Inflation takes purchasing power from lazy money and gives it to people who invest their money in real capital with real value.

Why do you want to subsidise lazy money and penalise productive capital?

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:28:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Improbable. No citizenry anywhere has ever preferred wage suppression and unemployment to inflation

Er, not true. I know of one. :-(

by Katrin on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:32:39 PM EST
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No, they have been offloading the unemployment on the rest of the Eurozone.

If you had 20 % unemployment in Germany (which you would if you had implemented the Hartz idiocy in a floating exchange rate system), no sober German would have supported the inflation first policy.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:37:12 PM EST
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The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill
by r------ on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 05:42:51 PM EST
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Well, yeah, Sarkozy is in denial.

Do you have any more breaking news?

tens of millions of people stand to see their lives ruined because the bureaucrats at the ECB don't understand introductory economics -- Dean Baker

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Feb 14th, 2012 at 04:46:45 PM EST
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