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The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 12:01:10 PM EST
International Groups Move to Criminalize Fake Drugs: Scientific American

When police officers, scientists and doctors launched an investigation into the scourge of counterfeit medicines in South East Asia, they were shocked to find that nearly half of the anti-malarials that they seized were fakes. Even more alarming was the discovery that many of the blister packs presumed to contain life-saving tablets were tainted with safrole, a carcinogenic compound used to make the illicit party drug ecstasy.

The presence of safrole underscored the link between bogus pharmaceuticals and criminal syndicates, which flourish in a legal grey zone that rewards counterfeiters with high profits at low risk.

"For a criminal interested in making money, it's less dangerous to traffic in counterfeits than to traffic in illegal drugs," says Susanne Keitel, director of the European Directorate for the Quality of Medicines and HealthCare (EDQM) in Strasbourg, France. That is because, although counterfeits endanger patients, diminish public faith in essential care and hamper economic growth, their deliberate manufacture is classified not as criminal activity, but as patent infringement.

That may now change, as cross-border collaborations try to criminalize counterfeit drugs and coordinate global enforcement. Public-health authorities welcome the development, but say that years of inattention have turned the problem into a crisis.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 01:22:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Oxygen detected in atmosphere of Saturn's moon Dione: Discovery could mean ingredients for life are abundant on icy space bodies

ScienceDaily (Mar. 2, 2012) -- Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists and an international research team have announced discovery of molecular oxygen ions (O2+) in the upper-most atmosphere of Dione, one of the 62 known moons orbiting the ringed planet. The research appeared recently in Geophysical Research Letters and was made possible via instruments aboard NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which was launched in 1997.

Dione -- discovered in 1684 by astronomer Giovanni Cassini (after whom the spacecraft was named) -- orbits Saturn at roughly the same distance as our own moon orbits Earth. The tiny moon is a mere 700 miles wide and appears to be a thick, pockmarked layer of water ice surrounding a smaller rock core. As it orbits Saturn every 2.7 days, Dione is bombarded by charged particles (ions) emanating from Saturn's very strong magnetosphere. These ions slam into the surface of Dione, displacing molecular oxygen ions into Dione's thin atmosphere through a process called sputtering.

Molecular oxygen ions are then stripped from Dione's exosphere by Saturn's strong magnetosphere.

A sensor aboard the Cassini spacecraft called the Cassini Plasma Spectrometer (CAPS) detected the oxygen ions in Dione's wake during a flyby of the moon in 2010. Los Alamos researchers Robert Tokar and Michelle Thomsen noted the presence of the oxygen ions.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 01:23:10 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Earth Formed from Diverse Meteorite Mix: Scientific American

Earth's building blocks were more eclectic than once thought, according to a new study suggesting our planet formed from collisions of many different types of meteorites.

Our planet is thought to have formed around 4.5 billion years ago from a disk of dust grains left over from the cloud of material that built our sun. These grains slowly clumped together, drawn by gravity into pebbles, then boulders, then planetary embryos. Eventually, enough mass coalesced to form the planet Earth.

Scientists had thought that most of the bodies that merged to make Earth formed from a narrow zone in space and were similar to each other, belonging to a subclass of meteorites called enstatite chondrites. This idea was based on measurements of numerous striking similarities between different types of atoms (called isotopes) of elements such as oxygen, nickel and chromium, between the Earth and enstatite chondrites.

But a new study of the silicon isotope signature of Earth rock samples and meteorites suggests that Earth is made of a more diverse mix of meteorites. [The Solar System To Scale (Infographic)]



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Sun Mar 4th, 2012 at 01:23:29 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Brian Paddick for Mayor of London: You Break It - You Fix It
We need to look at punishment from the criminal's viewpoint, not ours. Many criminals get up late, laze around home all day and rarely go out - except to commit crime. Their worst nightmare is what most of us do every day - having to get up early, travel across London and do a hard days work. Being locked-up in a prison cell for most of the day may be our idea of hell but for many it's just like being at home - except they don't have to pay for food and heating! Payback sentences ("community sentences" sounds soft and it isn't) are tough punishments that give back to Londoners, rather than us paying to keep criminals in prison, and it gets offenders used to the idea of work. We need a far greater emphasis on getting convicted criminals to put something back into society.

In prison, the only thing most people learn is how to be a better criminal - classes where inmates learn something useful like how to read and write are voluntary! Life after prison presents serious obstacles to housing and employment as prisoners lose their links with their own communities, and many reoffend soon after their release.

We need to make criminals pay something back to society for their crimes whilst at the same time giving them the skills to make the most of a second chance. At this election, for the first time ever, Londoners get to vote for a Mayor who will also be the Police and Crime Commissioner for London.

This is the Liberal Democrat mayoral candidate.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 10:30:24 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He's right, but to make it work we need an infrastructure to manage it effectively that will be expensive (tho' not as expensive as prison). However, it can't come out of the Mayor's budget, that's for the Home office/Justices secretary/whoever, so why is he talking about it ?

Might as well talk about foreign policy or tax issues.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:07:48 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Many criminals get up late, laze around home all day and rarely go out - except to commit crime.

Is the study based on all Murdoch journalists or just those at News of the World?

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:09:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He may be talking about investment bankers...

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:10:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There's a term for what he's proposing.

It's called "peonage," and is generally frowned upon in civilised society.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:16:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
He's trying to sound tough on crime:
Payback sentences ("community sentences" sounds soft and it isn't) are tough punishments that give back to Londoners


There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:20:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
... whenever "tough on crime" comes up:

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:25:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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