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Brian Paddick for Mayor of London: You Break It - You Fix It
We need to look at punishment from the criminal's viewpoint, not ours. Many criminals get up late, laze around home all day and rarely go out - except to commit crime. Their worst nightmare is what most of us do every day - having to get up early, travel across London and do a hard days work. Being locked-up in a prison cell for most of the day may be our idea of hell but for many it's just like being at home - except they don't have to pay for food and heating! Payback sentences ("community sentences" sounds soft and it isn't) are tough punishments that give back to Londoners, rather than us paying to keep criminals in prison, and it gets offenders used to the idea of work. We need a far greater emphasis on getting convicted criminals to put something back into society.

In prison, the only thing most people learn is how to be a better criminal - classes where inmates learn something useful like how to read and write are voluntary! Life after prison presents serious obstacles to housing and employment as prisoners lose their links with their own communities, and many reoffend soon after their release.

We need to make criminals pay something back to society for their crimes whilst at the same time giving them the skills to make the most of a second chance. At this election, for the first time ever, Londoners get to vote for a Mayor who will also be the Police and Crime Commissioner for London.

This is the Liberal Democrat mayoral candidate.

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 10:30:24 AM EST
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He's right, but to make it work we need an infrastructure to manage it effectively that will be expensive (tho' not as expensive as prison). However, it can't come out of the Mayor's budget, that's for the Home office/Justices secretary/whoever, so why is he talking about it ?

Might as well talk about foreign policy or tax issues.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:07:48 AM EST
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Many criminals get up late, laze around home all day and rarely go out - except to commit crime.

Is the study based on all Murdoch journalists or just those at News of the World?

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:09:54 AM EST
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He may be talking about investment bankers...

There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:10:52 AM EST
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There's a term for what he's proposing.

It's called "peonage," and is generally frowned upon in civilised society.

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:16:14 AM EST
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He's trying to sound tough on crime:
Payback sentences ("community sentences" sounds soft and it isn't) are tough punishments that give back to Londoners


There are three stories about the euro crisis: the Republican story, the German story, and the truth. -- Paul Krugman
by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:20:44 AM EST
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... whenever "tough on crime" comes up:

- Jake

Friends come and go. Enemies accumulate.

by JakeS (JangoSierra 'at' gmail 'dot' com) on Mon Mar 5th, 2012 at 11:25:19 AM EST
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