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Japan is warned on nuclear energy risk - World - The Boston Globe

TOKYO - In an unusually stark warning, Japan's prime minister during last year's nuclear crisis told a parliamentary inquiry Monday that the country should discard nuclear power as too dangerous, saying the Fukushima accident had pushed Japan to the brink of "national collapse.''

In testimony to a panel investigating the government's handling of the nuclear disaster, the former prime minister, Naoto Kan, also warned that the politically powerful nuclear industry was trying to push Japan back toward nuclear power despite "showing no remorse'' for the accident.

Kan's was the most closely watched testimony in the six-month-old inquiry, which was started by lawmakers who felt an earlier internal investigation by the government had papered over problems. Kan used the appearance to criticize the relatively pronuclear stance of the current prime minister, Yoshihiko Noda, who replaced him in August.



*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 29th, 2012 at 01:30:09 PM EST
[ Parent ]
New feed-in tariff system a rush to get renewables in play | The Japan Times Online

On July 1, a new law takes effect requiring utilities to purchase electricity generated from five renewable energy sources at a fixed price for a set length of time, under what is known as a feed-in tariff system.

The law was approved on the morning of March 11, 2011, by then Prime Minister Naoto Kan's Cabinet, just a few hours before the Great East Japan Earthquake and monster tsunami hit, claiming some 19,000 lives and putting the government's long-pushed nuclear power goals totally out of public favor.

It was the last piece of legislation passed in the Diet on Aug. 26, over stiff opposition from industry lobbies, utilities, and the Ministry of Economy, Trade, and Industry. Kan quit later that day.

The article has a breakdown of the planned rates. Most run for 20 years.

  • Rates for solar encourage larger plants: the rate is uniform (and rather generous at c. €0.42/kWh), but plants under 10 kW get it for ten years only.
  • OTOH rates for wind encourage small-scale wind: while the c. €0.23/kWh rate for large wind is generous, sub-20-kW turbines get two and a half times that much! No differentation for off-shore.
  • Minihydro rates are also generous, and favour smaller plants (three levels set between the lower wind and the solar rate).
  • I suspect geothermal rates aren't that generous: the higher one, for sub-15-MW plants, is set to the same level as solar.
  • There is biomass, too.

The high rates are explicitly aimed at creating a boom in the first three years. However, there is no word about the method of degression thereafter.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Tue May 29th, 2012 at 01:48:20 PM EST
[ Parent ]
is very very small, I guess they are targeting urban vertical things on buildings and individual houses.
That would change the landscape!

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Wed May 30th, 2012 at 04:00:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Noise levels, too. I wonder who sold them on the idea of residential wind being good and residential PV being bad.

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.
by DoDo on Wed May 30th, 2012 at 04:59:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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