Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
 EUROPE 



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman

by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 12:36:15 PM EST
Norovirus may have affected 100,000 over Christmas, says health agency | UK news | The Guardian

The winter vomiting bug affected about 100,000 people over Christmas with the number of confirmed cases 72% higher than this time last year, Health Protection Agency figures indicate.

The dramatic rise was attributed in part to an early outbreak of the illness, caused by the norovirus, which closed dozens of hospital wards as it struck across Britain.

Laboratory-confirmed incidents of norovirus amounted to 3,877 cases recorded in England and Wales, a rise from the 2,255 tally of last year.

The Health Protection Agency (HPA) said that for every reported case an estimated 288 were not flagged up, meaning that about 1.12 million people could have contracted the illness this season.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 01:26:19 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I think that's a serious under-estimate. The official advice was, if you have it, stay in, don't go out. Especially, DON'T go to doctor or hospital, it's too infectious it'll pass.

So that 100k represents those people who don't read the news, watch tv or listen to radio.

Many people seem to have had it in the last 3 weeks (I didn't).

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:17:14 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Gay mass services in Soho abolished by archbishop of Westminster | UK news | The Guardian

The Archbishop of Westminster, head of Roman Catholics in England and Wales, has ordered that special fortnightly "Soho masses" for gay and lesbian churchgoers in central London are not appropriate and are to be axed.

The services, intended to be particularly welcoming to lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgendered Catholics, had been held at Our Lady of the Assumption church in the West End for six years with the blessing of senior clergy but had attracted criticism from traditionalists.

The cancellation by Archbishop Vincent Nichols will be seen as a victory for those who lobbied for an end to what they see as an affront to church teachings.

The move comes as the Catholic church fights plans for same-sex marriage. Nichols has been one of the loudest voices opposing government plans to allow same-sex marriage, criticising them as "a shambles" and "Orwellian" in a BBC interview broadcast on Christmas Day.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 01:26:39 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm amazed they even happen at all. But then again, I am bewildered by the idea that self-respecting gay people feel a need to go to a religious intitution which makes every show of hating them utterly.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:19:25 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Number of employed Germans on the rise for another year | Business | DW.DE | 02.01.2013

Statisticians in Germany have said the number of employed people in the country has kept increasing despite the financial crisis. Over the past 12 months, more jobs have been available in many sectors of the economy.

2012 saw another rise in the number of employed people across Germany, the National Statistics Office (Destatis) said on Wednesday on the basis of preliminary calculations.

It said some 41.5 million people were employed in Germany last year, marking a 1.0-percent increase from 2011 levels and a rise for the sixth consecutive year.

Since 2005, the army of employed people in the country has swollen by 6.8 percent, or by 2.66 million people in absolute terms.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 01:26:54 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Hallelujah! Part-time jobs!
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 02:43:54 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Solar energy on the rise in Germany | News | DW.DE | 01.01.2013

Solar energy is on the rise in Germany, with a record 1.3 million photovoltaic systems in 2012. The increase comes as new consumer taxes on energy are to take effect in the country.

The recent solar boom means the alternative form of energy now reaches 8 million homes in Germany, a 45 percent increase compared to 2011, the German Solar Industry Association (BSW) said on Tuesday.

"Germany is now reaping the fruits of its efforts in solar technology," said the BSW's chief executive, Carsten Körnig. "Its share of the power supply has quadrupled in just three years. At the same time, the price of a new solar power system installation has halved."

The new numbers come as a consumer tax increase on energy takes effect. Starting this month, taxes will increase on consumer power bills from 3.6 euro cents ($4.76 cents) to 5.3 cents per kilowatt hour in a bid to help finance the cost of the country's switch to renewable energy.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 01:27:17 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Jimmy Savile police arrest two more men | UK news | guardian.co.uk

The Metropolitan police have made two further arrests in their Operation Yewtree investigation into alleged sexual offences by Jimmy Savile and others.

A 53-year-old man was arrested in Hampshire and a 59-year-old man held in west London on suspicion of sexual offences on Wednesday.

The suspects take the total number of people arrested under Operation Yewtree to nine.

The Met police said the two arrests fall under the "others" strand of the investigation, meaning the alleged offences are not connected to Savile.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 02:10:05 PM EST
[ Parent ]
One of them appears to have been the seriously unpleasant right wing comedian Jim Davidson.

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:21:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]
French weekly prints Prophet Muhammad drawing - Europe - Al Jazeera English

A French satirical magazine, whose offices were fire-bombed after it published cartoons on the Prophet Muhammad last September, has published a 64-page special issue with cartoons on the life of Islam's founder.

The editor of Charlie Hebdo weekly insisted that the publication titled "The Life of Muhammad", which was published on Wednesday, was a properly researched and educational work prepared by a Franco-Tunisian sociologist.

Prior to publication, Stephane Charbonnier, who was also the illustrator of the book, said "I don't think higher Muslim minds could find anything inappropriate".

He told the AFP news agency last week that "It is a biography authorised by Islam since it was edited by Muslims."

On Monday a senior political advisor to Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan denounced the work as a deliberate provocation.

"To transform the life of the prophet of Islam into a cartoon is in itself a mistake," Ibrahim Kalin wrote on his Twitter account.



The fact is that what we're experiencing right now is a top-down disaster. -Paul Krugman
by dvx (dvx.clt št gmail dotcom) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 02:29:50 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I wish Charlie Hebdo were available as a paid pdf in real time. I'd buy a subscription.

Align culture with our nature. Ot else!
by ormondotvos (ormond.otvosnospamgmialcon) on Wed Jan 2nd, 2013 at 07:42:34 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'll buy it and review it here.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:40:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
the biography may be authorised, but were the cartoons ? Islam has a big issue with people attempting to portray Mohammed

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:23:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
you are talking about. One of the primary difficulties of being a Muslim today is that one is subject to intellectual terrorism by extremists who attempt to dictate what it is to be a Muslim. In my experience, the Salafists who are the worst offenders, are about as representative as Muslims in general as Fred Phelps of Westboro is representative of American Christians.

Certain segments or tendencies of Islam have a big issue with portrayals of Mohamed. This has always been the case, and there has always been great diversity on this issue among Muslims.  Bad taste to quote Wikipedia, but the article is pretty well-referenced :

Depictions of Muhammad - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

The permissibility of depictions of Muhammad, the founder of Islam, has long been a concern in the religion's history. Oral and written descriptions are readily accepted by all traditions of Islam, but there is disagreement about visual depictions.[1][2] The Quran does not explicitly forbid images of Muhammad, but there are a few hadith (supplemental teachings) which have explicitly prohibited Muslims from creating visual depictions of figures.

Most Sunni Muslims believe that visual depictions of all the prophets of Islam should be prohibited[3] and are particularly averse to visual representations of Muhammad.[4] The key concern is that the use of images can encourage idolatry.[5] In Shia Islam, however, images of Muhammad are quite common nowadays, even though Shia scholars historically were against such depictions.[4][6] Still, many Muslims who take a stricter view of the supplemental traditions will sometimes challenge any depiction of Muhammad, including those created and published by non-Muslims.[7]

The Arabian tradition tended to forbid all portrayal of living things. This seems to have broken down a bit in the TV age. The Turkish pictorial tradition is of course the counter-example.

But the more important thing to bear in mind is that any historical tradition or sacred law forbidding portrayal of Mohammed or anyone else could only apply, by definition, within territories governed by a Muslim political power. Postulating an obligation to accede to demands of non-depiction based on a notion of religious freedom is completely fallacious and baseless. The demand is explicitly political, conceived as such by those making it and claiming to speak for all Muslims, and it is our duty to resist it.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:39:59 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I have no problem supporting muslems who wants to exercise their right to portray their profet. But that is not generally what happens, what generally happens is that westerners brought up in Christianity finds easy targets in another culture and thereby feeds the fundamentalists sense of a culture war against another culture.

Lets also remember that pictures of Muhammed - and republishing those pictures - became a big deal in February 2006 when non-violent protests, boycotts and symbolic destruction (flags, an empty embassy in Syria) in the Muslem world had got Aftenposten to apologise for offense they caused (30th of January 2005). Yes, it is a pitty for comic writers that gets caught up in a culture war they did not ask for, but it is not like this is the only taboo out there. Just by following the news, I have after January 2006 noticed that comics of the royalty in the nude is forbidden in Spain, as well as depicting cops as pigs is forbidden in France.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 07:43:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Well, Charlie Hebdo is definitely not "brought up in Christianity" - they target the Catholic church with equal enthusiasm (and nastiness) but get less publicity from that as it is a more traditional fare for them, and thus not newsworthy...


Wind power
by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:07:32 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I think you misunderstand me. I meant that to refer to persons growing up in a predominanatly Christian society, and thus better suited to critique Christian practises then any other. Am I wrong, is it a publication dominated by people grown up in any other culture?

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se
by A swedish kind of death on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:05:23 PM EST
[ Parent ]
You are not wrong.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:23:51 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Eurointelligence Daily Morning Newsbriefing: Delirious markets declare euro crisis over (03.01.2013)
Italian spreads fell to 283bp as markets react euphorically to the fiscal cliff deal, amid unbroken optimism about the eurozone; the latest Italian polls see a massive advantages for Pier Luigi Bersani's PD; Mario Monti's alliance scores between 10 and 12%, but could yet emerge as a king maker if the PD falls short of a majority in both chambers of parliament; Silvio Berlusconi says Monti was part of a criminal conspiracy of international banks to bring down his government; Monti said he keeps having difficulties following Berlusconi logic; the latest forecast show a massive rise in Italian unemployment, especially in the south; while the private sector suffers, the Italian public sector's revenues are increasing; Jonathan Hopkin says Berlusconi will not win the election, but he could still score a surprise; Gavin Jones says Monti's labour market reforms have so far failed to bring any benefits; the Greek general government had a primary surplus between January and November last year; finance minister says country will be within the agreed 2012 deficit target of 1.5% of GDP; the pressure is growing on a former Greek finance minister over allegations that he tampered with a list of tax refugees; the Spanish Socialists are proposing to turn the country into a federal state to counter the threat of regional separatism; the Spanish government is considering a number of measures to reduce SME's dependence on bank loans; a Spanish newspaper writes that the 2012 deficit will come in at 9% of GDP - completely busting the target; Portugal's president has referred the 2013 budget to the Constitutional Court; the eurozone's manufacturing sector purchasing managers' index continued to shrink further in December - while US manufacturing is slowly picking up; German employment reached a new record, despite the economic slowdown; car sales fell dramatically in Italy, Spain and France during 2012; an investors' survey shows that the risk of a eurozone breakdown has fallen dramatically; US money market funds are slowly returning to the eurozone - or rather to Germany - but overall funding levels are still low; Lex, meanwhile, warns that the eurozone crisis is far from over.


I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:29:42 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Berlusconi attacks Monti and Napolitano, wants a commission of inquiry...

Berlusconi has accused Monti of a criminal complicity to use the Italian spreads to engineer his downfall. According to Il Messaggero Berlusconi said his resignation was triggered by a plot of international creditors, including Deutsche Bank, and by Monti. That's why he wants to setup a special commission of enquiry. Berlusconi also said one investigate Giorgio Napolitano's role in the crisis.

... and Monti jokes over the "international plot"

Monti responded to Berlusconi allegations, calling it "interesting" but odd. Berlusconi confuses him on a logical level, Monti said, expressing a hope that voters were less confused than he was, he said during an interview on the RAI radio show Radio Anch'io. Monti remarked his government had avoided a full economic disaster through austerity measures, which were needed to stabilise public finances. Monti also said he wants to cut payroll taxes to revitalize Italian economy.



I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 03:32:17 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Delirious markets declare euro crisis over

Mission Accomplished! v.2.0

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:20:08 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Exclusive: Treat white working-class boys like ethnic minority, Willetts tells universities - Education News - Education - The Independent

Universities will be told they should recruit more white, working-class boys in the wake of figures showing a massive slump in applications from men for courses.

The Universities minister David Willetts wants white, working-class teenage boys put in the same category as students from other disadvantaged communities and ethnic minorities - as groups that should be targeted for recruitment.

Promoting access for boys, particularly for working-class boys, seems pretty uncontroversial. But unless he has numbers indicating that white working-class boys have a lower rate of university access than non-white working-class boys, the introduction of the racial element is completely outrageous.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:04:57 AM EST
[ Parent ]

unless he has numbers indicating that white working-class boys have a lower rate of university access than non-white working-class boys, the introduction of the racial element is completely outrageous.

I read (probably here on ET) that the numbers for white working class boys were indeed lower.

Wind power

by Jerome a Paris (etg@eurotrib.com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:08:40 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I don't know about university access, but I have commented here on ET that the performance of white working class English boys (not girls!) already by 6th grade in primary school is significantly worse than other gender/race/ethnicity groups.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:21:02 AM EST
[ Parent ]
If they perform poorly by 6th grade they are not likely to be competitive for university at age 16 or 17.

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."
by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:22:18 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Whilst I agree that there is a problem with the university prospects of working class white boys. I would argue that in fact what we are seeing is a failing of both the education system in general as well as the encroaching un-affordability of further education in the UK. Everybody knows there are no jobs, so why saddle yourself with a debt you can never repay to achieve no actual improvement in prospects ? Far better for somebody who has a brain to gain a useful trade such as plumbing or electrician.

And the conservatives know this.

But they also know that they are losing the white working class who were Thatcher's children and whose support is needed should they ever regain power. So we have dog-whistles. This isn't the only one I've heard recently but, imo, it's the most blatant.

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:58:23 AM EST
[ Parent ]
England is terribly classist, and employers routinely discriminate against candidates not coming from the "red brick" universities (Oxford, Cambridge and Imperial College).  Now that tuition fees for public universities have pretty much been equalised with those of "red brick" universities, bringing them to about 9 thousand pounds per year, many people who would have gone for a university degree may realise that they will have to get in debt to study at a second tier university but that classism will lock them out of jobs where they might earn enough to repay those student loans. So the calculus shifts against going to university at all, unless you can make it into a "red brick".

Just my own impression, I'm not sure whether actual English youth think in these terms.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:28:02 PM EST
[ Parent ]
I'm not sure whether actual English youth think in these terms.

Anecdotally, such considerations are becoming a factor

keep to the Fen Causeway

by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:45:53 PM EST
[ Parent ]
British Universities
1. Ancient Universities

Ancient universities in the United Kingdom and Ireland were founded during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Since no universities were founded in the United Kingdom and Ireland between the 16th and 19th century, the term "ancient university" generally refers to institutions of higher education that were established before the 19th century.

The ancient universities (in order of formation) are:

source

Due to their sheer age and continuous academic and scientific output, all of the ancient universities are very reputable. The two top universities in UK, which are continuously found in first and second place of the British league tables, are Oxford and Cambridge. Together they are known as Oxbridge and share a century old rivalry, which dates back to when Cambridge was founded by dissident Oxford scholars.

Oxbridge is often compared to the American Ivy League universities, but it is important to note that all Ivy League institutions are private universities, while Oxford and Cambridge are state-owned.

Both universities are divided into more than thirty colleges. Since each college at Oxford only offers a certain range of subjects, the choice of college often depends on the field of study. At Cambridge, on the other hand, all colleges give students to opportunity to study any subject offered by the university as a whole.

Yet in spite of the differences and rivalries, there is also much cooperation between Britain's two oldest academic institutions. Most Oxford colleges have a sister college in Cambridge. Some colleges even share a common name, but are not necessarily sister colleges. There is for instance a Trinity College at Oxford (sister college: Churchill College, Cambridge) as well as a Trinity College at Cambridge (sister college: Christ Church, Oxford). 2. Red Brick Universities

Red Brick Universities - named after the buildings they were housed in which were usually built with red brick - were founded in the industrial parts of the cities during the Victorian era (1837-1901) and before the Second World War. They are sometimes also called "civic universities", a movement that started in 1851 with Owens College, which later became the Victoria University of Manchester and today is called University of Manchester.

The main difference between Red Brick and ancient universities is that Red Bricks were so called non-collegiate institutions and admitted men without regarding their religion or social background. Furthermore they concentrated on teaching predominantly "practical subjects" often linked to engineering.

Some Red Brick universities include:



'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty
by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 06:47:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
"Red-brick" is actually a derogatory term for universities founded mostly in the 19C in major provincial cities (built of red brick rather than ancient stone...).

Yes, Oxbridge and some other prestigious places (like Imperial) command the best job spots. But this is to a great extent due to the class intake of these universities. The British class system perpetuates itself by hiring the children of the ruling class to follow in the footsteps of their elders. If you're not a child of the upper/upper-middle class, an Oxbridge degree will not suffice to open all doors to you -- unless you have been a particularly brilliant student, in which case you may be co-opted, while upper-class graduates can make do with a mediocre degree and be welcomed.

This doesn't mean that red-brick and more recent universities command no respect, and that graduates can't get a job. The problem is more one, as you say, of salaries unlikely to cover the cost of repayment of student loans. Sooner or later, Britain will have to face up to the fact that education is a public good that calls for public financing. Until then, the City rules, and the City is a flying island that doesn't care about the country beneath's infrastructure.

I have no idea either of how British youth see their prospects. In particular, white working-class youth.

by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Fri Jan 4th, 2013 at 03:03:16 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Nicolas Sarkozy DID take $50 million of Muammar Gaddafi's cash, French judge is told - Europe - World - The Independent

Documentary proof exists that France's former President Nicolas Sarkozy took more than €50m from the late Libyan dictator, Muammar Gaddafi, a French judge has been told.

The claim, leaked today, was made just before Christmas by a Lebanese-born businessman, Ziad Takieddine, who has been a fixer for legal - and allegedly illegal - dealings between France and the Middle East for 20 years.

Expanding on claims already made by one of Mr Gaddafi's sons and a French investigative website, Mr Takieddine told an investigative judge that he could show him written proof that Mr Sarkozy's first presidential campaign in 2006-7 was "abundantly" financed by Tripoli. The payments, he said, continued after Mr Sarkozy became President.

In total, he said, they exceeded the €50m in illegal payments to Mr Sarkozy claimed by Mr Gaddafi's son Saif al-Islam just before the demise of the Libyan regime - thanks partly to French and British airstrikes - in 2011.

Mr Takieddine's claims were rejected today as "outrageous" and "self-interested" by sources close to Mr Sarkozy. Last year President Sarkozy denounced a similar claim by the investigative website Mediapart as "grotesque".



It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II
by eurogreen on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:16:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Will it break ? Or will the traditional rightwing sympathies of the press draw a veil over it ?

keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 10:40:55 AM EST
[ Parent ]
More a matter of the judicial process. It's a leak. The papers are presumably weighing whether to publish or not, based on whether there's a risk of the procedures being invalidated because of the leak.

No, the press will happily tear Sarko apart now he's out of power.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 11:11:18 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Er... It was fairly widely reported yesterday. Starting from Le Parisien and going on to other organs such as the Nouvel Obs, l'Express, etc.

Nouvelles accusations de Takieddine sur le financement Sarkozy, Guéant dément - Flash actualité - Politique - 02/01/2013 - leParisien.fr New Takieddine charges on Sarkozy's funding , Gueant denies - Flash News - Politics - 02/01/2013 - leParisien.fr
L'intermédiaire franco-libanais Ziad Takieddine a assuré devant le juge Renaud Van Ruymbeke détenir des preuves du financement par la Libye de la campagne présidentielle de 2007 de Nicolas Sarkozy, selon le quotidien Le Parisien de mercredi.
Des accusations aussitôt démenties par l'ancien ministre de l'Intérieur Claude Guéant, directement mis en cause, pour qui il s'agit de "pures affabulations".
The Franco-Lebanese middleman Ziad Takieddine declared before the judge Renaud Van Ruymbeke he has evidence of funding by Libya of the 2007 presidential campaign of Nicolas Sarkozy , according to the daily Le Parisien on Wednesday. Charges immediately contradicted by former Interior Minister Claude Gueant, directly accused, who says it is "pure fabrication."
Selon le Parisien, Ziad Takieddine, plusieurs fois mis en examen dans le volet financier de l'affaire de l'attentat qui a coûté la vie à onze Français en 2002 à Karachi, a déclaré le 19 décembre au juge détenir les preuves d'un financement par la Libye de la campagne présidentielle de 2007 de Nicolas Sarkozy.
M. Takieddine a déclaré au juge qu'il pouvait lui "fournir les éléments existants sur le financement de la campagne de Nicolas Sarkozy" et que "le montant de cette aide dépasserait les 50 millions d'euros, somme un temps évoquée par l'un des fils du dictateur libyen" Mouammar Kadhafi.
Il a affirmé, selon le quotidien, que plusieurs rencontres avaient eu lieu avant l'élection entre Béchir Saleh, alors secrétaire particulier de Mouammar Kadhafi, et Claude Guéant qui était alors directeur de cabinet du ministre de l'Intérieur Nicolas Sarkozy.
According to Le Parisien, Ziad Takieddine, several times indicted for the financial aspect of the affair of the attack that killed eleven French in 2002 in Karachi, declared December 19 to the judge that he holds evidence of Libyan funding of the 2007 presidential campaign of Nicolas Sarkozy. Mr. Takieddine told the judge that he could "provide the existing elements of proof of financing the campaign of Nicolas Sarkozy" and that "the amount of funding was over 50 million euros, a sum mentioned at one time by a son of the Libyan dictator " Muammar Gaddafi. He said, according to the newspaper, several meetings were held before the election between Bashir Saleh, then secretary of Muammar Gaddafi, and Claude Gueant, who was then Chief of Staff of the Minister of the Interior Nicolas Sarkozy.
by afew (afew(a in a circle)eurotrib_dot_com) on Thu Jan 3rd, 2013 at 04:20:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Occasional Series