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tasteful political humour is not what CH is famous for.

(And it's not "The film that embraces the Muslim world:"
it's "The film that sets the Muslim world on fire")

The "fesses" line is of course a reference to Brigitte Bardot in J-L Godard's film Le Mépris

(about 3 minutes in, if you're impatient)

I find the reference funny on a couple of levels.

A number of CH articles on the theme of religion are available on line.


It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Jan 7th, 2013 at 10:51:00 AM EST
[ Parent ]
There's also a fart joke: Mohammed, a star is born.

I seriously don't understand what purpose is advanced by rallying in defence of titty and ass and fart jokes about Mohamed (or anyone).

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Mon Jan 7th, 2013 at 11:04:15 AM EST
[ Parent ]
no, the comic book does not contain stuff like that. It's a straightforward illustrated biography. Once you get over Charb's rather ugly style (his characters all look much the same, except when he's drawing political figures who have to be recognizable), the usual comic-book mechanisms come into play, you like the hero, you learn about his life and formative influences, it's difficult to read through it and not come out with a positive opinion of Mohamed the man (it covers his early life, before he declared himself the Prophet).

The comic effects come mostly from the miraculous folklore which is recounted and illustrated (Mo's parents were perpetually bathed in a luminous glow; when Mo crossed the desert on his camel, he was always accompanied by a cloud which protected him from the sun; and so on). But in modern times, probably only the mentally-retarded actually literally believe that sort of stuff, so I see no harm, from a religious point of view, in making fun of it.

Whether the reader concludes that the comic is hostile towards Islam or towards Muslims is entirely subjective, of course (objectively, that would be hard to demonstrate, since it covers Mo's pre-Islamic period). I think not.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Mon Jan 7th, 2013 at 11:23:09 AM EST
[ Parent ]
especially knowing that the people who don't like that are a persecuted minority, yes.
If someone made those jokes about the shareholders of Northrop Grumman reacting to the news of children in Pakistan, I'd forget my humanitarian scruples for a moment. But bey, I guess targeting that lot isn't progressive enough.  
by Katrin on Mon Jan 7th, 2013 at 11:28:30 AM EST
[ Parent ]
You rally to the defense of free speech, not crudity. Polite speech, of course, needs no defense. It might be kinda subtle, this point.

See the ACLU.org page for arguments.

Align culture with our nature. Ot else!

by ormondotvos (ormond.otvosnospamgmialcon) on Sat Jan 12th, 2013 at 11:09:41 PM EST
[ Parent ]
Polite speech, of course, needs no defense.

And in that you're wrong. Censorship censors ideas. If you express your ideas crudely you allow the censors the easy wae out of censoring you for obscenity or lack of decorum.

I distribute. You re-distribute. He gives your hard-earned money to lazy scroungers. -- JakeS

by Carrie (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Sun Jan 13th, 2013 at 05:11:13 AM EST
[ Parent ]

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