Welcome to European Tribune. It's gone a bit quiet around here these days, but it's still going.
Display:
Wife of Bath:
the ubiquitous violence on television and in the cinema (and on the news) make you feel there's much to fear all around you

I think there is a point to seperate between different types of violence and fear here. On one hand, the fantasies of power and redemptive violence in most of the examples listed, on the other hand the scary violence in the news, tv and films where someone is out to get you or your kids. All of those american series with deranged psycho sadists hunted by the cops and news reports of kidnapped babies I think is much more likely to induce fear then a violence festival signed Tarantino.

Wife of Bath:

Art imitating life? Life imitating Art?

USA has compared to other countries a really high amount of gun violence. American movies are seen in USA and lots of other countries. So the first one fits better.

Sweden's finest (and perhaps only) collaborative, leftist e-newspaper Synapze.se

by A swedish kind of death on Wed Jan 30th, 2013 at 10:34:52 AM EST
[ Parent ]
hmmm. Do people watch American gun films differently perhaps, depending on whether they are American or not?

Just speculating : an American might identify with the situations and with the gunman; for a European, it might be pure escapist fantasy, no different from sci-fi.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Wed Jan 30th, 2013 at 10:38:50 AM EST
[ Parent ]
"American movies are seen in USA and lots of other countries. So the first one fits better."

But one has to take into account the context in which they are shown, lighting a flare in an open football stadium is different from the tragic case in Brazil of doing it in a nightclub (even if it had had better exits).

Showing a film encouraging the use of guns to resolve problems in the US with its levels of gun ownership (and the widepspread positive attitude about this) is different from showing it in Japan:

In October 1992, in Louisiana, a Japanese exchange student named Yoshihiro Hattori went into the wrong house on the way to a Halloween party. The homeowner's wife screamed for help and the homeowner drew his .44 pistol and yelled for the student to 'freeze!' Not understanding the American idiom that 'freeze!' means 'Don't move or I'll shoot', the student continued advancing towards the homeowner. The homeowner pulled the trigger and shot him dead.[1] While the incident initially attracted only brief attention in the national American press, the shooting horrified Japan; hundreds of thousands of Japanese have signed petitions calling for the United States to implement gun prohibition, and Hattori's parents have announced plans to begin working with the American lobby, Handgun Control Inc.[2]

To many Japanese, and to many Americans, it is simply incomprehensible that the United States has not implemented strict gun controls or prohibitions along the Japanese model. Gun control in Japan is the most stringent in the democratic world. The weapons law begins by stating 'No-one shall possess a fire-arm or fire-arms or a sword or swords', and very few exceptions are allowed.[3] Gun ownership is minuscule, and so is gun crime. As gun crime in other nations increases, many advocates of gun control urge that Japan's gun control policy be imitated.

http://www.guncite.com/journals/dkjgc.html



Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Wed Jan 30th, 2013 at 12:34:37 PM EST
[ Parent ]
The interesting thing is that Japanese society still carries a strong cultural memory of the absolute horror of arbitrary killing by the sword-bearing class.

One can only hope that a similar epiphany will happen one day in the USA, and that it won't take a military defeat accompanied by nuclear strikes to bring it about.

It is rightly acknowledged that people of faith have no monopoly of virtue - Queen Elizabeth II

by eurogreen on Thu Jan 31st, 2013 at 04:06:19 AM EST
[ Parent ]
The idea permeating American gun-ownership is to avoid enabling a ruling class which controls all weapons...

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sat Feb 2nd, 2013 at 05:28:35 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Swords were actually banned in the Meiji period- 1876. Nothing to do with WWII.
by de Gondi (publiobestia aaaatttthotmaildaughtusual) on Sat Feb 2nd, 2013 at 06:58:44 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Was around at the time. Local exchange student rep said "if someone tells you to 'freeze,' please please stand still."


-----
sapere aude
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:29:56 PM EST
[ Parent ]
'68 I was in Houston. A long-haired BBC cameraman. Friend from LA  told me that if the cops pull you over, don't try the immediately-out-of-the-car, claim the neutral space - "Officer, is this really necessary? gambit."

"Keep your frickin' hands on the wheel, do not turn your head, do not speak unless spoken to, and follow orders immediately." It was excellent advice.

You can't be me, I'm taken

by Sven Triloqvist on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:40:07 PM EST
[ Parent ]
by Number 6 on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:45:25 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Newborn babies, the elderly and the infirm are believed to comprise the non-feared 2 percent.


But watch out for those two-year olds ! - in a house where even the mother has assault weapons.

And the elderly need to be really old - those old varmits can still pull a trigger :-)


But there remains a group of elderly inmates who committed violent crimes during their golden years, proving the point that many victims worry about.

Research has shown that arrests of elderly offenders have risen.

http://www.correctionsone.com/products/medical-supplies/articles/1965383-The-aging-inmate-issue-Can- we-afford-elderly-incarceration/



Maybe it's because I'm a Londoner - that I moved to Nice.
by Ted Welch (tedwelch-at-mac-dot-com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 04:23:11 PM EST
[ Parent ]
That's pretty good advice if stopped in any State in the USA.

I can swear there ain't no heaven but I pray there ain't no hell. _ Blood Sweat & Tears
by Gringo (stargazing camel at aoldotcom) on Sat Feb 2nd, 2013 at 12:26:05 AM EST
[ Parent ]
Very good advice if you're stopped by Swedish police as well.

Peak oil is not an energy crisis. It is a liquid fuel crisis.
by Starvid on Sat Feb 2nd, 2013 at 05:29:43 AM EST
[ Parent ]
All of those american series with deranged psycho sadists hunted by the cops and news reports of kidnapped babies I think is much more likely to induce fear then a violence festival signed Tarantino.

I don't think they're unrelated.

Kindness and basic humanity are the new taboos in Hollywood. You can show all the sadism and gore you want, but if you show people acting humanely, audiences and critics will want your blood.

Hollywood is just a reboot of gladiatorial Rome without the free bread. The idiot-obsession with guns and gangsta machismo is a symptom, not a cause.

by ThatBritGuy (thatbritguy (at) googlemail.com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 07:24:58 AM EST
[ Parent ]
I agree. When I said "and the news" I was thinking about my grandmother, who was sure she was going to be robbed, raped and murdered every time she left the house. She watched and pored over every crime story there was. I tended to ignore them, and though I had several brushes with danger in my lifetime, I didn't suffer the "effects of crime" that she did.

As people pointed out during the 9-11 incident, little children whose parents didn't prevent them from seeing it over and over on television were made terribly afraid because they couldn't quite understand that it was not a continuing thing.  When I was a young adult, the news didn't report every "juicy" crime that occurred in the world over and over and over like they do today. One gets the feeling that violent crime is just around every corner 24/7, but it isn't, and I refuse to listen to stories about crimes that weren't committed on my street in order to avoid "becoming" my grandmother.

I have liked some films that were violent, though, but not in an enjoyment-of-violence kind of way; it was more in spite of the violence. And "Dexter" is a guilty pleasure.

'tis strange I should be old and neither wise nor valiant. From "The Maid's Tragedy" by Beaumont & Fletcher

by Wife of Bath (kareninaustin at g mail dot com) on Fri Feb 1st, 2013 at 12:48:21 PM EST
[ Parent ]

Display:

Top Diaries

Occasional Series