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Some of the most widely used encryption methods might be broken within a couple of years:

Math Advances Raise the Prospect of an Internet Security Crisis | MIT Technology Review

Alex Stamos, chief technology officer of the online security company Artemis, led a presentation describing how he and three other security researchers studied recent publications from the insular world of academic cryptopgraphy research, which covers trends in attacking common encryption schemes.

"Our conclusion is there is a small but definite chance that RSA and classic Diffie-Hellman will not be usable for encryption purposes in four to five years," said Stamos, referring to the two most commonly used encryption methods.

RSA and Diffie-Hellman encryption are both underpinned by a mathematical challenge known as the discrete logarithm problem. That problem is computationally difficult to solve, ensuring that encrypted data can only be decoded quickly with knowledge of the secret key used to encode it in the first place. Breaking RSA or Diffie-Hellman encryption today requires using vast computing resources for significant periods of time.

However, it is possible that algorithms able to solve the discrete logarithm problem quickly could exist. "We rely on that efficient algorithm not being found," said Jarved Samuel, a cryptographer who works for security consultancy ISEC Partners and presented alongside Stamos. "If it is found the cryptosystem is broken."

The next cryptography frontier is supposed to be  elliptic curve cryptography (ECC). The kicker?

Math Advances Raise the Prospect of an Internet Security Crisis | MIT Technology Review

The U.S. National Security Agency has for years recommended ECC as the most reliable cryptographic protection available. In 2005 the agency released a toolkit called SuiteB featuring encryption algorithms to be used to protect government information. SuiteB makes use of ECC and eschews RSA and Diffie-Hellman. A classified encryption toolkit, SuiteA, is used internally by the NSA and is also believed to be based on ECC.
by Bernard on Fri Aug 16th, 2013 at 03:25:06 PM EST

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