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I don't see how homogenization can be even remotely good.  Our regulatory structure in the US is something out of the 14th Century.
by rifek on Sun Jan 19th, 2014 at 07:29:43 PM EST
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First, I don't agree that US regulatory structure in general is "out of the 14th century." In many ways, particularly information gathering and transparency it is far ahead of Europe and everywhere else.  However, in the areas where it does need improvement -- particularly privacy concerns, food traceability, GMO regulation of grain traceability, and pesticide and agricultural chemical regulation , the US stands to gain a lot by adopting some of the European frameworks and forcing US industries to adapt to those. Europe stands to gain by opportunities to increase the democratization of regulatory information, while the US stands to gain by adopting some of Europe's more consumer-friendly protections.
by santiago on Mon Jan 20th, 2014 at 07:51:12 PM EST
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Transparent?  Our regulatory agencies are a revolving door - between themselves and the industries they are supposed to regulate.  They are owned.  Nothing in this treaty will change that.  Further, I do not see Europe's consumer-friendly regulations being adopted here but rather the anti-consumer (and anti-labor, anti-environmental, etc.) regulations here being used to attack regulations in Europe.
by rifek on Tue Jan 21st, 2014 at 01:41:38 AM EST
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While environmental legislation may be stronger in Europe, regulation is recognized by activists on both sides of the lake to be much better in the US, even after accounting for the EPA's chronic lack of funding to achieve its broad mission. The reason is the broad central authority and data collection capabilities of the US EPA and associated agencies.  I don't know that this treaty will be able to provide an opportunity for homogenization of environmental regulations, but if it does European environmentalists stand to benefit by using the process the push for common regulatory frameworks closer to the US data-driven system (while US heavy industry pushes for a European model which notoriously allows for cheating and honor system reporting). Almost the exact opposite is the case with food and drug regulation.  
by santiago on Tue Jan 21st, 2014 at 02:12:24 PM EST
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The exceptions to the regulations here eat the regulations.  Industrial "agriculture" is effectively exempt from water pollution regs.  Our air pollution regs are a joke.  Don't believe me?  Walk out my front door and breathe.  Better take a chainsaw to cut the air.
by rifek on Wed Jan 22nd, 2014 at 07:11:06 PM EST
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