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Clashes as protesters strike against labor reforms in Italy | News | DW.DE | 12.12.2014

The strike, called by the nation's biggest union coalition, the CGIL and two smaller confederations, the UIL and UGL, hit public transport, hospitals, schools and civil administrations across the country. More than 50 rallies were held nationwide, with around 40,000 participating at a demonstration in Rome.

...The new labor reforms are a bone of contention between Prime Minister Matteo Renzi and Italy's workforce. The 39-year-old prime minister has proposed the "Jobs Act," aimed at loosening restrictions on companies wanting to fire employees when business is slow.

Unemployment in Italy is at a record 40 percent and workers' unions believe that the government needs to change its policies on employment rather than target the labor force. "The Jobs Act and the budget do nothing to revive the economy and create jobs," Susanna Camusso, head of the CGIL said.

I snipped the parts of the article where the DW desk editor frames the issue in a reformist-biased way...

*Lunatic*, n.
One whose delusions are out of fashion.

by DoDo on Fri Dec 12th, 2014 at 03:33:11 PM EST
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"I snipped the parts of the article where the DW desk editor frames the issue in a reformist-biased way..."

Mercifully.  

"It is not necessary to have hope in order to persevere."

by ARGeezer (ARGeezer a in a circle eurotrib daught com) on Sat Dec 13th, 2014 at 07:56:41 AM EST
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The 39-year-old prime minister has proposed the "Jobs Act," aimed at loosening restrictions on companies wanting to fire employees when business is slow.
Sounds familiar? Ah yes, we've been hearing this in France and other European countries for the past forty years. Like burning a village in order to save it, this logic claims that, to create more jobs, you need to, you know, destroy jobs even faster.

Funnily, such policies have done nothing but let unemployment grow higher and higher for three decades in a row. I suppose that pointing out such an abysmal track record would get you accusations of "crass Keynesianism" or worse...

(my spell checker initially proposed: "to crate more jobs...")

by Bernard on Sun Dec 14th, 2014 at 05:27:25 AM EST
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It's becoming increasingly obvious to the workers how the ECB pretends to have their welfare in mind, its actions -and lack of- are pauperising whatever industries which are still hanging on by their nails.

The much touted 'foreign investment' then steps in to buy the firm for pennies on the dollar.

'The history of public debt is full of irony. It rarely follows our ideas of order and justice.' Thomas Piketty

by melo (melometa4(at)gmail.com) on Sun Dec 14th, 2014 at 05:51:57 AM EST
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At a record 40%

That can't be right.  More German math I think.

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill

by r------ on Tue Dec 16th, 2014 at 07:56:53 AM EST
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Under 25 male unemployment.
by Colman (colman at eurotrib.com) on Tue Dec 16th, 2014 at 08:02:06 AM EST
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in the cited article? May be true but not the way it is presented.

Thus the comment about a certain kind of (distorted) math.

The Hun is always either at your throat or at your feet. Winston Churchill

by r------ on Mon Dec 22nd, 2014 at 07:22:53 AM EST
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by das monde on Tue Dec 16th, 2014 at 08:18:38 AM EST
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Monti comments
Il 14 febbraio 2012, quale premier e ministro dell'Economia, decisi di non firmare l'impegno che mi veniva richiesto dal Comitato olimpico internazionale per prendere in considerazione la candidatura di Roma all' Olimpiade del 2020. Firmandolo, avrei obbligato lo Stato, cioè in concreto i governi che sarebbero venuti negli anni successivi, a pagare ogni eventuale eccedenza di costi rispetto a quelli coperti dal comitato organizzatore.

Forse Renzi non ricorda quali erano le condizioni del Paese in quella fase. Lo spread non era più a quota 575 punti come nel novembre 2011, ma era ancora intorno ai 400 punti. Nei mercati e tra i governi dei maggiori Paesi erano ancora molti coloro che pensavano che l'Italia sarebbe uscita dal «rischio insolvenza» solo ricorrendo a prestiti di salvataggio della Ue e del Fmi, sottoponendosi così a «protettorato» da parte della troika. Del resto, molti osservatori attribuivano la crisi della Grecia, scoppiata nel 2009, anche alle conseguenze finanziarie dello sforzo olimpico. Quel 14 febbraio dissi in conferenza stampa: «Non vogliamo che la percezione che stiamo faticosamente cercando di dare dell'Italia negli ambienti internazionali, nell'Ue, nei mercati, possa essere compromessa da improvvisi dubbi, magari alimentati dai concorrenti dell'Italia nella sfida olimpica, circa la serietà dei propositi di risanamento finanziario del Paese.

by gk (gk (gk quattro due due sette @gmail.com)) on Tue Dec 16th, 2014 at 08:28:16 AM EST
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An Olympic bid is the last refuge of the scoundrel.

A society committed to the notion that government is always bad will have bad government. And it doesn't have to be that way. — Paul Krugman
by Migeru (migeru at eurotrib dot com) on Tue Dec 16th, 2014 at 10:11:54 AM EST
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