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Although the author mostly writes about good beer, he is, at heart, a marketing person, and so brings an interesting perspective to things. I found this very illuminating

Pete Brown - How Big Lager Lost The Plot And Developed Narcissistic Personality Disorder

As anyone who has read Man Walks into a Pub will know, my entry into the world of beer was via Big Lager. I loved lager ads when I was growing up as a teenager.

Later, once I was helping make those ads, I was fascinated by the tribal loyalty people had to their favourite beer brands.

If you were a group of mates in your twenties, Carling or Heineken or Carlsberg was like another one of your gang, always there when all the best times happened. In research groups you sometimes do an exercise where you ask people to imagine what brands would be like if they were people at a party. Beer brands were always characterised as confident, friendly guys, witty and popular without being an arse, enjoying a drink but never getting too drunk. This guy was never the pack leader, not necessarily the most popular or pushy guy in the room, but everyone liked him.

Things started go go wrong around 1997. Advertising regulations grew ever tighter and the funny campaigns of the eighties were no longer possible. And beer started to take itself seriously. It wanted to provide a bit of substance behind the good-natured banter. Fair enough. But the picture started to blur.



keep to the Fen Causeway
by Helen (lareinagal at yahoo dot co dot uk) on Wed Jun 3rd, 2015 at 11:58:36 AM EST

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